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Double Dribble
Ron Fimrite
December 14, 1998
Basketball icons from two distinctly different eras reflect on their careers
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December 14, 1998

Double Dribble

Basketball icons from two distinctly different eras reflect on their careers

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The Author portrays in words and pictures 21 women athletes. Some, like Jackie Joyner-Kersee and Tara Lipinski, are famous; others, like sprinter Aimee Mullins, are lesser-known but certainly worthy. Mullins, a double amputee, is a world-record holder in the Paralympic 100 meters and the long jump.

The Sporting News Selects Baseball's 100 Greatest Players
By Ron Smith, Sporting News Publishing Co., $29.95

One hundred-best lists are apparently a fin de si�cle affliction, yet they are not without charm. Selecting the best ballplayers of the century is not, as Sporting News editorial director John D. Rawlings acknowledges, "a pure science."

Koppett's Concise History of Major League Baseball
By Leonard Koppett, Temple University Press, $34.95

THIS IS AS useful and, yes, concise a history of the game as you will find, and it is written in the meticulous and polished prose we've come to expect from this preeminent baseball scholar.

Reflections of the Game: The Photographs of Ronald C. Modra
Essay by Pat Jordan, Willow Creek Press, $29.50

Modra has been photographing baseball players, mostly for this magazine, for more than 25 years, and here he gives us more than 200 pictures, along with observations on his subjects. There are brief contributions by present and past stars. A delightful look, a delightful read.

A Steeler Odyssey
By Andy Russell, Sports Publishing, Inc., $22.95

Russell, an outstanding linebacker on the great Pittsburgh Steelers teams of the 1970s, portrays his teammates on the field as well as far off it, in such unlikely places as a war zone in Vietnam and on hair-raising wilderness adventures. Russell, now a Pittsburgh businessman, writes well, and his friends come solidly to life. Or to death, as in his extraordinary description of the fatal heart attack suffered by his closest Steelers pal, Ray Mansfield, on a 1996 backpacking trip in the Grand Canyon.

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