SI Vault
 
Six PACK
Paul Zimmerman
April 19, 1999
On draft day teams will find plenty of passers to go around
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
April 19, 1999

Six Pack

On draft day teams will find plenty of passers to go around

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue
1 2

"Fast enough," says Brown, "and it takes a real man to bring him down. I saw the Gridiron Classic all-star game, and one guy came in clean and hit him with a form tackle and just bounced off. I know people who think he's the best of all of them."

The fifth quarterback, who's projected to go no higher than the middle of the first round, is McNown. Among a typical crop of quarterbacks he might be top 10, but he suffers in comparison with this year's big four. His arm is good enough for the pros but not quite as strong as the others'; he's a little short at 6'¾"; and he has a slightly sidearm delivery. "I'm hearing the same stuff on him that I heard about Steve Young when he came out," says Ferguson. "Hey, all this guy does is play well—and win. Plus, he's tougher than hell."

Which brings us to the sleeper, who in 1998 had the most productive year of any college quarterback. How about King's numbers: 36 touchdown passes and a 68% completion rate for a 12-0 team, six interceptions, 532 yards and 10 TDs rushing—and he played most of the season with a cast on his left wrist, which he broke in the Green Wave's third game. Productive as he may have been, King is only 5'11⅞. There's that height thing again. Hey, anyone ever heard of Doug Flutie? "King is the guy I like most in the whole draft," says San Diego Chargers general manager Bobby Beathard. "I just wish he was as tall as the other guys."

Are we forgetting someone? Another sleeper perhaps, someone who might slip in as a second-round pick and raise more eyebrows? "Joe Germaine from Ohio State," Modrak says. "He'll drop a few notches, and whoever drafts him is going to get a damn good player. Just watch."

1 2