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USCS RED RIGHT 22 Z HOOK
Lars Anderson
August 16, 1999
This West Coast offense mainstay succeeds by spreading the defense and providing the quarterback with numerous options. The quarterback, Carson Palmer (left), has four options: His first is the strongside (or tight-end-side) wideout, who runs 12 yards down the field and curls back. If that receiver is covered, the quarterback turns toward the running back who has taken a wide flare and is one yard behind the line of scrimmage. (The other running back is a decoy.) The third option is the tight end, who hooks across the field and sets up four to six yards past the line of scrimmage. If the tight end is covered, the next option is the weakside wideout, who runs a 14-yard postcurl pattern.
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August 16, 1999

Uscs Red Right 22 Z Hook

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This West Coast offense mainstay succeeds by spreading the defense and providing the quarterback with numerous options. The quarterback, Carson Palmer (left), has four options: His first is the strongside (or tight-end-side) wideout, who runs 12 yards down the field and curls back. If that receiver is covered, the quarterback turns toward the running back who has taken a wide flare and is one yard behind the line of scrimmage. (The other running back is a decoy.) The third option is the tight end, who hooks across the field and sets up four to six yards past the line of scrimmage. If the tight end is covered, the next option is the weakside wideout, who runs a 14-yard postcurl pattern.

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