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Our Favorite Feats
Richard Hoffer
December 27, 1999
They astonished us by going where no athlete had gone before, boldly surmounting the hurdles, both literal and metaphorical
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December 27, 1999

Our Favorite Feats

They astonished us by going where no athlete had gone before, boldly surmounting the hurdles, both literal and metaphorical

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16
April 9-July 10, 1953
Ben Hogan
The 1949 auto accident that nearly killed Ben Hogan left him with battered legs and shoulders and an impaired left eye, but at the 1953 Masters he broke the tournament scoring record by five strokes. At brutal Oakmont he won his fourth U.S. Open by six strokes. He did not play in the PGA Championship that year because it overlapped with the British Open, where he mastered the smaller British ball, then mastered Carnoustie to win by four. Hogan played in six events in 1953 and won five of them.

17
April 23, 1964
Bob Baun
Toronto defenseman Bob Baun came off the ice late in Game 6 of the Stanley Cup finals against Detroit after a Gordie Howe slap shot fractured his right ankle. He told a trainer to tape him up, then scored in overtime. Baun spent the next 48 hours ducking the team doctor, then played half the game in Toronto's 4-0 win in Game 7.

18
July 23, 1989
Greg LeMond
The experts said the final trial was too short, the time to make up too great. But LeMond raced through Paris faster than any Tour de France cyclist ever had, and when leader Laurent Fignon crossed the finish line, LeMond had won by an unthinkable eight seconds.

19
March 26, 1973
Bill Walton
"Our strategy is simple," John Wooden once said. "Go to [Bill] until the opposing team stops it." Nobody did in the 1973 NCAA championship game, as Walton scored 44 points on 21-of-22 field goal attempts in UCLA's 87-66 defeat of Memphis State.

20
1960-1984
Richard Petty
How towering is Perry's NASCAR record of 200 career wins? The racer in second has 105. The meteoric Jeff Gordon can catch Petty—if he maintains his current pace...for 16 more years.

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