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Tom Verducci
March 27, 2000
"Don't take this the wrong way," Yankees pitching coach Mel Stottlemyre told lefthanded pitcher Ed Yarnall this spring, "but you remind me of Sid Fernandez in a lot of ways." Like Fernandez, whom Stottlemyre tutored with the Mets (1984-93), Yarnall, 24, has a sneaky-quick fastball that doesn't light up the radar gun but somehow ties up righthanded hitters. Like Fernandez, the 6'3", 234-pound Yarnall has a body better suited to the Krispy Kreme counter than the ball field. Like Fernandez, Yarnall uses his heft to his advantage by hiding the ball from the hitter just before releasing it. Yarnall's under-whelming stuff and lack of athleticism might explain why he has been traded twice (by the Mets and the Marlins). He does have a 26-9 minor league mark over the past two seasons and impressed manager Joe Torre in a five-game cameo with the Yankees last year. "What I saw was a guy who competed when he got into trouble," Torre says. "He doesn't back down."
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March 27, 2000

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"Don't take this the wrong way," Yankees pitching coach Mel Stottlemyre told lefthanded pitcher Ed Yarnall this spring, "but you remind me of Sid Fernandez in a lot of ways." Like Fernandez, whom Stottlemyre tutored with the Mets (1984-93), Yarnall, 24, has a sneaky-quick fastball that doesn't light up the radar gun but somehow ties up righthanded hitters. Like Fernandez, the 6'3", 234-pound Yarnall has a body better suited to the Krispy Kreme counter than the ball field. Like Fernandez, Yarnall uses his heft to his advantage by hiding the ball from the hitter just before releasing it. Yarnall's under-whelming stuff and lack of athleticism might explain why he has been traded twice (by the Mets and the Marlins). He does have a 26-9 minor league mark over the past two seasons and impressed manager Joe Torre in a five-game cameo with the Yankees last year. "What I saw was a guy who competed when he got into trouble," Torre says. "He doesn't back down."

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