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Connecting Flights
May 01, 2000
Giving new meaning to the term occupational hazard, in January, Troy Harman—cohost of MTV's Senseless Acts of Video—skydived from one plane to another, which was nosediving at 120 mph with the engine off. Like ail the show's stunts, Hartman's senseless skydive was an homage to a scene in a music video—in this case, the Foo Fighters' Learning to Fly. "We got to 12,000 feet in the plane, and I knew it was then or never," says Hartman, a 1996 world champion sky diver, who free-fell 800 feet during the stunt. "I aimed for the plane's midsection so I wouldn't damage a wing or propeller, and just tackled it."
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May 01, 2000

Connecting Flights

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Giving new meaning to the term occupational hazard, in January, Troy Harman—cohost of MTV's Senseless Acts of Video—skydived from one plane to another, which was nosediving at 120 mph with the engine off. Like ail the show's stunts, Hartman's senseless skydive was an homage to a scene in a music video—in this case, the Foo Fighters' Learning to Fly. "We got to 12,000 feet in the plane, and I knew it was then or never," says Hartman, a 1996 world champion sky diver, who free-fell 800 feet during the stunt. "I aimed for the plane's midsection so I wouldn't damage a wing or propeller, and just tackled it."

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