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The Sheen Collection
May 01, 2000
Looking for a package of Champ prophylactics featuring Ted Williams's unauthorized image? Hungry for a piece of wedding cake from Joe DiMaggio's 1939 marriage to starlet Dorothy Arnold? Seeking a used Mike Tyson mouthpiece? At this week's Leland's auction of actor Charlie Sheen's memorabilia (www.lelands.com), only serious sports fans need apply. How serious? A business card from Shoeless Joe Jackson's liquor store carries a $500 reserve price, and a canceled $20 check signed by Ted Kluszewski will set you back at least $100.
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May 01, 2000

The Sheen Collection

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Looking for a package of Champ prophylactics featuring Ted Williams's unauthorized image? Hungry for a piece of wedding cake from Joe DiMaggio's 1939 marriage to starlet Dorothy Arnold? Seeking a used Mike Tyson mouthpiece? At this week's Leland's auction of actor Charlie Sheen's memorabilia (www.lelands.com), only serious sports fans need apply. How serious? A business card from Shoeless Joe Jackson's liquor store carries a $500 reserve price, and a canceled $20 check signed by Ted Kluszewski will set you back at least $100.

After II years of serious collecting, Sheen is letting go of most of the stash he once insured for $6 million. "I can only own so much stuff," says Sheen, who appeared in the baseball movies Major League and Eight Men Out. "It's time to put it back in circulation."

A lifelong fan who sports Reds and Yankees tattoos on his biceps, Sheen has been collecting memorabilia since 1989, when the guys building a display case for his newly purchased Williams jersey made it too big for one item.

Among the novelties he's putting on the block are the ball Mookie Wilson grounded between Bill Buckner's legs in Game 6 of the 1986 World Series, the glove that missed it and the cleats betwixt which it rolled.

Sheen isn't selling everything, Among the keepsakes he's hanging onto are Willie Mays's 1954 Silver Bat and the contract covering the Red Sox' sale of Babe Ruth to the Yankees. "I might wake up one day and say this isn't that important," he says of the contract, "But right now it's like the Shroud of Turin in the baseball world,"

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