SI Vault
 
Mother Knows Best
July 17, 2000
Truth be told, Kateree Davis doesn't resort to popping out of airplane baggage compartments to make sure her Terrell is getting his Chunky Soup. (That's an actress in those ads.) The Broncos back's mom did, however, attend the third annual preseason meeting of the Professional Football Players Mother's Association (PFPMA) at Orlando's Wyndham Hotel last weekend. About 50 women, including Zenobia Anderson (mother of the Falcons' Jamal), Gladys Bettis (mom of the Steelers' Jerome) and Alkay Williams (Cowboy Erik's mother), gathered to discuss strategies to keep their millionaire sons wise to the dangers of everything from get-rich-quick schemes to fast food.
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
July 17, 2000

Mother Knows Best

View CoverRead All Articles

Truth be told, Kateree Davis doesn't resort to popping out of airplane baggage compartments to make sure her Terrell is getting his Chunky Soup. (That's an actress in those ads.) The Broncos back's mom did, however, attend the third annual preseason meeting of the Professional Football Players Mother's Association (PFPMA) at Orlando's Wyndham Hotel last weekend. About 50 women, including Zenobia Anderson (mother of the Falcons' Jamal), Gladys Bettis (mom of the Steelers' Jerome) and Alkay Williams (Cowboy Erik's mother), gathered to discuss strategies to keep their millionaire sons wise to the dangers of everything from get-rich-quick schemes to fast food.

The notebook-toting matriarchs attended seminars on such topics as The Media and the NFL ("Many of our sons are under attack," read the description in the program), The After-Life ("Are our sons prepared for their life after football?") and Player Security ("Learn more about how to protect our sons from fraud and shady characters"). In response to the death of Kansas City Chiefs linebacker Derrick Thomas in February from injuries suffered in a high-speed car crash, a lecture on air bag and seat belt safety was also on the agenda. The women later presented an emotional Edith Morgan, Thomas's mother and a PFPMA member, with two dozen roses.

"Our sons are in a tough business, and it's our job to provide both support and unconditional love," says PFPMA founder Cassandra Ogden, who started the organization not long after her son Jonathan was selected by the Ravens in the first round of the 1996 draft. "People think that once these boys make it to the pros that they don't need their mothers anymore. That's when we're needed more than ever."

1