SI Vault
 
The Toast of the Town
Tom Verducci
November 06, 2000
After leading the Yankees to another World Series title, cool yet fiercely competitive Derek Jeter owns Yankee Stadium—and the rest of New York City—the way no player since Joe DiMaggio has
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
November 06, 2000

The Toast Of The Town

After leading the Yankees to another World Series title, cool yet fiercely competitive Derek Jeter owns Yankee Stadium—and the rest of New York City—the way no player since Joe DiMaggio has

View CoverRead All Articles
1 2 3 4 5

Two nights later Jeter rested his feet on an ottoman in his small, modestly furnished apartment on the East Side of Manhattan. His ironing board and iron stood at the ready by his dining table. He had slept past noon the past two days and left his apartment only for dinners, once in the Bronx with friends and this night in midtown with his parents. On Sunday he would eat downtown at a team party arranged by Torre. On Monday, after his fourth victory parade through lower Broadway, he was booked to do Letterman.

"No doubt, this team ranks up there with any team of all time," Jeter says. "You can come up with teams that had better players or hit more home runs or scored more runs. But the name of the game is winning. I can't see any team being better."

Outside, 11 floors below the drawn blinds, life after the Subway Series pulsed on. The usual cacophonous symphony of car horns and tire screeches continued. Nothing had changed. This winner wasn't going anywhere. More than ever, this is his town. More than ever, this is his team.

1 2 3 4 5