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November 13, 2000
Screened?Michael Jordan to the Max, by Al Gore's campaign staff. The Vice President rented out the Nashville IMAX theater for about 150 staffers in hopes that the MJ film would inspire them in the final days of the presidential race.
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November 13, 2000

Blotter

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Screened
? Michael Jordan to the Max, by Al Gore's campaign staff. The Vice President rented out the Nashville IMAX theater for about 150 staffers in hopes that the MJ film would inspire them in the final days of the presidential race.

Revealed
?Aussie tennis great John Newcombe's link to a 1976 drunk driving incident. After drinking with buddies at a bar in Kennebunkport, Maine, Newcombe was being driven to a friend's parents' house when police pulled over the the car in which he was riding. The driver, George W. Bush, was arrested and convicted of driving under the influence.

Dismissed
?By a New Jersey Superior Court judge, criminal charges against John Hogan and James Kenna, the two state troopers who shot and wounded three aspiring pro basketball players during an April 1998 traffic stop, an incident that set off a national discussion of racial profiling (SI, July 10, 2000). Federal authorities now are investigating whether the troopers should be prosecuted for violating the victims' civil rights.

Granted
?To Wrigley Field, preliminary landmark status by the Commission on Chicago Landmarks, meaning that any proposal to remodel Wrigley must be approved by the commission. Tribune Company, which owns Wrigley and the Cubs and has discussed expanding the seating in the bleachers, opposed the designation.

Thrown Out
?A $24.5 million jury award to former Blues enforcer Tony Twist, who had sued artist Todd McFarlane, claiming that the fictional mob kingpin Antonio Twistelli in McFarlane's Spawn comic book series sullied Twist's name.

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