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MASTER OF THE MIKE
January 15, 2001
When former track star and longtime broadcaster Marty Glickman died last week at age 83 of complications from bypass surgery, the world lost one of the last great radio men. The onetime voice of New York's Giants, Jets and Knicks, Glickman influenced generations of broadcasters through his work behind the mike and as a consultant for NBC, HBO, MSG Network and Sports-Channel. SI asked colleagues and prot�g�s of Glickman's to describe techniques they learned from him.
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January 15, 2001

Master Of The Mike

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Here are the won-lost records of teams the week after they had a first-round bye, since the NFL went to the 12-team playoff format in 1990.

WON-LOST

PCT.

NFC teams

21-1

.955

AFC teams

15-7

.682

All teams

36-8

.818

When former track star and longtime broadcaster Marty Glickman died last week at age 83 of complications from bypass surgery, the world lost one of the last great radio men. The onetime voice of New York's Giants, Jets and Knicks, Glickman influenced generations of broadcasters through his work behind the mike and as a consultant for NBC, HBO, MSG Network and Sports-Channel. SI asked colleagues and prot�g�s of Glickman's to describe techniques they learned from him.

Marv Albert: "There should be a course taught in journalism schools entitled Marty Glickman, the way you might study Fellini in film school. He set the terminology for basketball play-by-play. On radio it was very precise. Right side of the lane. Left side, top of the key. Right baseline. He would always drum into me, 'What kind of shot is it? Is it a running one-hander? Is it a jumper from 15 along the baseline? Does he drive, stop, jump, shoot? Be precise because you're providing the eyes for the listener.' "

Bob Costas: "When I started in the early 1980s, I said to him, 'I look so much younger than I am,' which was a standing joke around NBC. 'What can I do to counteract that?' He said, 'Have you ever heard an older person who talks really fast? Hardly ever. Try to slow down and have a more measured pace.' That was good advice. It gave me a little more authority."

Gayle Sierens (first female NFL announcer): "He was a great believer in less is more. He thought that one of the great mistakes announcers make is talking too much. He always said, 'It's not about you.' He also stressed giving down and distance and time remaining. Every time they moved the chains he wanted me talking about down and distance."

Bill Walton: "I was cursed with severe stuttering until I was 28 years old. Marty Glickman taught me how to speak. The tips he gave me almost 20 years ago I still apply every day: Slow down your thoughts; think about what you are saying now, not three or four sentences ahead. Chew sugarless gum to strengthen the muscles in your jaw and to get your mouth moving. Read out loud; it doesn't matter what the subject is, just do it a lot. When you are comfortable doing that, move in front of the mirror and watch yourself as others will see you speaking. Become a teacher—to anyone, anywhere, on any subject you know."

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