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Awards
Phil Taylor
February 19, 2001
Most Valuable Player Chris Webber, Kings. His scoring (27.3 points per game at week's end), board work (11.4 rebounds) and often overlooked passing (4.2 assists) have elevated Sacramento to membership in the league's elite. Allen Iverson may be equally indispensable to the 76ers, but as a Western Conference power forward, Webber faces Ail-Star-caliber competition on an almost nightly basis in Kevin Garnett, Karl Malone, Antonio McDyess, Dirk Nowitzki and Rasheed Wallace.
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February 19, 2001

Awards

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Most Valuable Player
Chris Webber, Kings. His scoring (27.3 points per game at week's end), board work (11.4 rebounds) and often overlooked passing (4.2 assists) have elevated Sacramento to membership in the league's elite. Allen Iverson may be equally indispensable to the 76ers, but as a Western Conference power forward, Webber faces Ail-Star-caliber competition on an almost nightly basis in Kevin Garnett, Karl Malone, Antonio McDyess, Dirk Nowitzki and Rasheed Wallace.

Rookie of the Year
Marc Jackson, Warriors. Usually, the only award a player with his r�sum� (second-round pick from Temple in '97, one year in Turkey, two in Spain) gets is a 10-day contract, but the 26-year-old Jackson has shown a polished game in the pivot.

Sixth Man
Ruben Patterson, Sonics. He performs the classic function of a sixth man: injecting his team with a dose of energy. The 6'5" Patterson changes the pace of the game with his slashes to the basket and his tireless work on the offensive boards.

Most Improved Player
Tracy McGrady, Magic. The blossoming of Mavericks point guard Steve Nash and of Kings forward Peja Stojakovic have been essential to their teams' improvement, but no one has made as dramatic a leap as McGrady, who went from being a sometime starter with the Raptors to an All-Star starter this year. His scoring average has jumped 10.9 points to 26.3 through Sunday, the biggest improvement in the league.

Defensive Player
Theo Ratliff, 76ers. Even though he's out until mid-March with a broken right wrist, the shot-blocking Ratliff is the pick. The key to Philly's stingy defense, Ratliff not only takes away his own man's post-up game, but can also stymie an entire team around the basket with his weakside help.

Coach of the Year
Dan Issel, Nuggets. He was the popular preseason choice as the coach most likely to be fired, and he had to quell a player revolt in December. Still he somehow has Denver in the playoff hunt. Larry Brown's work with the Sixers can't be ignored, but there's no tougher task for a coach than regaining control of a team that has turned on him.

Executive of the Year
Geoff Petrie, Kings. Pat Riley made flashier moves for the Heat, trading for forward Brian Grant and guard Eddie Jones, but Petrie's subtler deals have turned Sacramento into a contender. By trading forward Corliss Williamson to the Raptors for guard Doug Christie, he simultaneously opened up a starting spot for Stojakovic and upgraded the Kings' previously porous defense, which he further bolstered by adding backup point guard Bobby Jackson.

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