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IN THE CREASE
Pierre McGuire
March 05, 2001
Give the NHL hockey operations department credit for reversing a mistaken game misconduct penalty called last week on Senators forward Colin Forbes after Sabres goalie Dominik Hasek inadvertently hit him with his stick behind the Buffalo net. When Hasek followed his clearing attempt by spectacularly falling to the ice as if he had been checked, referees Paul Devorski and Don Van Massenhoven blew the whistle on Forbes. The league changed the decision three days later after Ottawa coaches pleaded Forbes's case, providing videotape to back up their argument. Three game misconduct penalties during a player's career results in a one-game suspension, with the ban increasing for future infractions....
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March 05, 2001

In The Crease

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Give the NHL hockey operations department credit for reversing a mistaken game misconduct penalty called last week on Senators forward Colin Forbes after Sabres goalie Dominik Hasek inadvertently hit him with his stick behind the Buffalo net. When Hasek followed his clearing attempt by spectacularly falling to the ice as if he had been checked, referees Paul Devorski and Don Van Massenhoven blew the whistle on Forbes. The league changed the decision three days later after Ottawa coaches pleaded Forbes's case, providing videotape to back up their argument. Three game misconduct penalties during a player's career results in a one-game suspension, with the ban increasing for future infractions....

Andrew McKim, who played in 38 NHL games from 1992 through '95, filed a lawsuit against Kevin Miller, a former journeyman forward with nine NHL teams, claiming Miller's hit from behind in a Swiss Elite League game three months ago caused a severe concussion that may end McKim's career. With all the dangerous checking from behind that occurs in the NHL, how long will it be before similar litigation occurs in North America?...

Last week Devils goaltender Martin Brodeur changed his leg pads for the first time since entering the league in 1992. His new pads are 2� inches longer than his old ones, and while the NHL has no rules on the length of leg pads-there is a 12-inch limit on width—some netminders are worried that the league will soon regulate the length as well.

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