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How to beat Maryland
Alexander Wolff
April 02, 2001
"Maryland's offensive sets are really predictable because they all end with flex motion out of a 2-3 offensive alignment," says an assistant whose team lost to the Terps in the NCAA tournament. "After huddles and timeouts they'll give a certain hand signal, and it wasn't long before our players were yelling out their plays. The hard part is keeping them from executing those plays.
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April 02, 2001

How To Beat Maryland

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" Maryland's offensive sets are really predictable because they all end with flex motion out of a 2-3 offensive alignment," says an assistant whose team lost to the Terps in the NCAA tournament. "After huddles and timeouts they'll give a certain hand signal, and it wasn't long before our players were yelling out their plays. The hard part is keeping them from executing those plays.

" Lonny Baxter is most comfortable deep down on the right block. They'll rub a wing off the opposing center to dislodge him so that Baxter can get deep. You have to front him and not let him catch the ball so deep, because he's not nearly as dangerous two or three feet outside the block. Baxter likes to shoot a righthanded half-hook, so force him to the middle. You should also double down on him and make him pass, since he's not a good passer. Terence Morris doesn't like contact inside, so be physical with him when he doesn't have the ball, which makes it tough for him to get the touches he wants. Morris has a lot of talent, but he's up and down. I don't understand the hype.

"Morris and Baxter can make plays when those plays are available, but Juan Dixon can create even when there's nothing there, so you have to put a quick guy on him. At point guard, Steve Blake isn't exceptionally quick, so you can wear him down with pressure by an athletic guard. Byron Mouton is a bit of a wild card. He brings energy, but you can help off him a little bit, and he won't kill you on the perimeter. Danny Miller is headstrong, so if you pressure him, he'll duck his head and try to drive past you, which allows you to draw charges. For a big guy Tahj Holden can really shoot, but like everyone else [except Dixon] he's a standing jump shooter who doesn't create his own shots."

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