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THE CADDIE COMMANDMENTS
July 30, 2001
Myles Byrne may go down as the patron saint of bad days at the office. With his boss, Ian Woosnam, tied for the lead in the final round of the British Open, caddie Byrne discovered he had let Woosnam play a hole with one too many clubs in his bag, a violation that cost Woosnam a two-stroke penalty. Woosnam called the oversight "the ultimate sin" for a caddie. Indeed, in the looper list of commandments, it's definitely up there, along with Thou shalt not let thy player hit the wrong ball. During the 1995 Buick Invitational, caddie John Burke mistakenly let Brad Faxon play Phil Mickelson's ball, resulting in a two-stroke penalty for Faxon. Later that year at the Buick Classic, Burke handed Faxon a different model ball from the one he'd started the round with—another two-stroke penalty. Amazingly, Burke kept his job.
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July 30, 2001

The Caddie Commandments

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Myles Byrne may go down as the patron saint of bad days at the office. With his boss, Ian Woosnam, tied for the lead in the final round of the British Open, caddie Byrne discovered he had let Woosnam play a hole with one too many clubs in his bag, a violation that cost Woosnam a two-stroke penalty. Woosnam called the oversight "the ultimate sin" for a caddie. Indeed, in the looper list of commandments, it's definitely up there, along with Thou shalt not let thy player hit the wrong ball. During the 1995 Buick Invitational, caddie John Burke mistakenly let Brad Faxon play Phil Mickelson's ball, resulting in a two-stroke penalty for Faxon. Later that year at the Buick Classic, Burke handed Faxon a different model ball from the one he'd started the round with—another two-stroke penalty. Amazingly, Burke kept his job.

Thou shalt not touch thy player's ball marker. At the Hartford Open, Keith Clearwater's caddie, Tom Williams, thought he was the first in his group to reach a green, so he picked up a coin from the putting surface. Williams hadn't seen Clearwater rush to the green, mark his ball and run off to a Porta Potti. Clearwater was assessed two strokes.

Thou shalt not lose a club. During a practice round before the 1994 British Open, Greg Kraft's putter was stolen after his caddie, Todd Blersch, left it leaning against a concession stand. Even though the putter was returned after the second round, Blersch got axed.

Thou shalt not let your player's shot hit the bag. At the 1998 Singapore Open, Ed Fryatt needed a par at the last hole to tie for third and remain atop the Asian tour's season money list. As Fryatt got set to tee off, his caddie walked ahead, stationing himself on the 18th fairway and leaving the bag in the rough. Fryatt's tee shot hit the bag, and he was penalized two shots. He finished tied for sixth in the tournament and fell to second on the money list.

Thou shalt not use artificial devices. At the 1996 LPGA Skins Game, David Esch, Annika Sorenstam's caddie and fianc� at the time, used a compass to gauge wind direction in the first fairway, a no-no that cost Sorenstam two strokes. The two were married a few months later, but Esch no longer caddies for her.

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