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Joe's Excellent Adventure
Alan Shipnuck
July 30, 2001
For Joe Ogilvie, playing in jolly old England was a hoot. Contending was an unexpected bonus
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July 30, 2001

Joe's Excellent Adventure

For Joe Ogilvie, playing in jolly old England was a hoot. Contending was an unexpected bonus

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Ogilvie missed the cut in 11 of his first 19 starts in 2001, but he had made three in a row going into the British Open and thought his game was cresting. After visiting his favorite pub the night of his courageous third-round performance at Royal Lytham, he got 10 hours of sleep but woke up on Sunday morning in a panic. "I was convinced mat I was going to win the British Open and that my life would change forever," said Ogilvie. "I might have been naive. I might have been trying to fool myself, but I'm glad I wasn't like a deer in the headlights. I was loving the challenge."

Ogilvie certainly didn't back off at the outset of the final round. He opened with three pars, the last one saved by a spectacular 230-yard nine-iron shot Tom the rough to the back of the green. Ogilvie bogeyed the 4th, though, then dropped another mot at the 5th when he found a greenside bunker. Striding to the next tee, Ogilvie was surprised to see his uncle Ron Huston, who lad flown over on Saturday night from Hartford, in his gallery. Several friends and family members :raveled to Lytham over the weekend to root for Ogilvie, and it Lancaster and New Albany Country Clubs, scores of members turned out to monitor Ogilvie's progress by means of TV and the Internet.

With so much international goodwill working for him, Ogilvie wouldn't help but birdie 10 and 11 to return to five under and climb back onto the leader board. He made only one mistake coming in, but it was a killer. Trying to rip a low fade off the 15th tee, he instead sliced his drive out of bounds. The ensuing triple bogey led to a 75. Had Ogilvie made par on 15, he would have finished among the top 15, which would have earned him an invitation to the British Open next year.

He lingered not on what had been lost but on what had been gained. "I picked up a lot of knowledge," Ogilvie said. He never suffered from jet lag, which he credited to drinking gallons of water, a tip from Tom Watson. "I also-discovered," Ogilvie said, "that a pint of beer every night before bed helps you sleep."

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