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the Beat
September 10, 2001
Here's good news for Little League man-child Danny Almonte: He's old enough to see the PG-13 rated baseball flick Hardball when it hits theaters on Sept. 14. Then again, he might not want to. The movie portrays the improbable success story of an urban Little League team that overcomes various obstacles, including the discovery that one of its stars is too old, a product of a doctored birth certificate. "It was eerie to see this playing out in real life," says director Brian Robbins. "Talk about life imitating art imitating sport." Robbins notes that though the parallels were coincidental, he had a vested interest in the Almonte story. "We're not trying to capitalize on the situation, but I think Hardball can help reinforce the idea that adults are often too zealous about a game that's supposed to be fun."...
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September 10, 2001

The Beat

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Here's good news for Little League man-child Danny Almonte: He's old enough to see the PG-13 rated baseball flick Hardball when it hits theaters on Sept. 14. Then again, he might not want to. The movie portrays the improbable success story of an urban Little League team that overcomes various obstacles, including the discovery that one of its stars is too old, a product of a doctored birth certificate. "It was eerie to see this playing out in real life," says director Brian Robbins. "Talk about life imitating art imitating sport." Robbins notes that though the parallels were coincidental, he had a vested interest in the Almonte story. "We're not trying to capitalize on the situation, but I think Hardball can help reinforce the idea that adults are often too zealous about a game that's supposed to be fun."...

David Justice's messy personal life has spilled onto the playing field-literally. A process server, looking to deliver a subpoena to Justice in his $5 million palimony case with ex-fianc´┐Że Nicole Foster, jumped out of the stands at Anaheim's Edison Field during the eighth inning of the Aug. 26 Angels-Yankees game and ran up to Justice to hand him the subpoena. The startled DH avoided the man, whom guards grabbed and threw out of the stadium. Afterward Justice said the process server "looked like he was on drugs. He was crazy as hell." Justice also says that as far as he's concerned, he has yet to be served....

Revolution Studios will produce a feature film starring skateboarder Tony Hawk (above). The as-yet-untitled movie will be a comedy that will showcase Hawk's skills. "There's going to be lots of action and a real plot, not just some cheesy West Side Story-meets-skateboarding deal," says Hawk, 33. "It's about a guy in his 30s trying to figure out what to do with his life. He decides to have one last-blast road trip in which he hits all the mythical skating spots." The film marks one of Hollywood's first attempts to crack the extreme sports market. "But it's not going to be a skate exploitation film," says Hawk, who plans to take acting lessons before shooting begins. "Skating's been stereotyped as punks and attitude, which isn't what we're about. This is going to be about loving the sport."

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