SI Vault
 
Blotter
November 05, 2001
Crashed?Michael D. Copeland, of Hampton, Ga., through the front gate of boxer Evander Holyfield's Fairburn, Ga., estate in his Chrysler LHS. Copeland, a postal worker, told police that he was taking Cipro as a precaution against anthrax and that he got disoriented when he felt a burning sensation on his skin. Copeland was treated for minor injuries at an area hospital; Holyfield is pressing charges of criminal damage to property.
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
November 05, 2001

Blotter

View CoverRead All Articles

Crashed
?Michael D. Copeland, of Hampton, Ga., through the front gate of boxer Evander Holyfield's Fairburn, Ga., estate in his Chrysler LHS. Copeland, a postal worker, told police that he was taking Cipro as a precaution against anthrax and that he got disoriented when he felt a burning sensation on his skin. Copeland was treated for minor injuries at an area hospital; Holyfield is pressing charges of criminal damage to property.

Debunked
?The Yankees' claim that outfielder Paul O'Neill is a direct descendent of Mark Twain. According to O'Neill's website, his great-grandmother, nee Mary Clemens, was a cousin of Twain's. A San Francisco Chronicle reader pointed out that if that's true, O'Neill isn't descended from Twain but is a distant relative.

Implored
?Drug-free athletes, by IOC president Jacques Rogge, to blow the whistle on competitors whom they suspect of using banned performance enhancers. "There has to be an effort by the clean athletes to point their fingers at the ones who cheat and tell them, 'We don't want you,' " Rogge told the BBC. "We will only succeed if the clean athletes want to fight with us against doping."

Died
?Ken Aston, 86, the British soccer referee who introduced yellow (caution) and red (ejection) cards. Aston hit on the idea while sitting at a traffic light after watching a 1966 World Cup match in which several players hadn't been aware that they'd been penalized. The cards debuted in the 70 World Cup.

Released
?By Topps, a 90-card Enduring Freedom set, featuring Osama bin Laden and other figures in the current conflict. Topps CEO Arthur Shorin says he expects children to "act out their disdain" for Bin Laden by tearing up, stomping or burning his card.

1