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short Yardage
Ivan Maisel
December 03, 2001
?YA GOTTA LOVE THIS GUYFor four years Clemson running back Tore White toiled as a walk-on who saw limited action on special teams and was, in his words, a "practice utensil." He dreamed of earning a football scholarship. Earlier this season Tigers coach Tommy Bowden awarded one to White, who'd redshirted as a freshman and is scheduled to graduate with a degree in microbiology in May. A few days later White gave it back. Having already earned a South Carolina Police Corps Scholarship and other grants, he would have received about $2,000 from the football grant-in-aid; another player who didn't receive nonathletic aid would get as much as $9,400 to cover tuition, room and board. "The $2,000 was much less important than helping somebody else," says White, who had eight tackles on special teams this year. "I always want to give back." Unbeknownst to White, Bowden then awarded the scholarship to junior fullback Tyrone Lee, another special teams player and White's roommate on the road. "I always knew Tore had a big heart and was a good guy," Lee says, "but that was really special."
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December 03, 2001

Short Yardage

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?YA GOTTA LOVE THIS GUY
For four years Clemson running back Tore White toiled as a walk-on who saw limited action on special teams and was, in his words, a "practice utensil." He dreamed of earning a football scholarship. Earlier this season Tigers coach Tommy Bowden awarded one to White, who'd redshirted as a freshman and is scheduled to graduate with a degree in microbiology in May. A few days later White gave it back. Having already earned a South Carolina Police Corps Scholarship and other grants, he would have received about $2,000 from the football grant-in-aid; another player who didn't receive nonathletic aid would get as much as $9,400 to cover tuition, room and board. "The $2,000 was much less important than helping somebody else," says White, who had eight tackles on special teams this year. "I always want to give back." Unbeknownst to White, Bowden then awarded the scholarship to junior fullback Tyrone Lee, another special teams player and White's roommate on the road. "I always knew Tore had a big heart and was a good guy," Lee says, "but that was really special."

?DRAFT BAROMETER
An NFL scout assesses Florida wide receiver Jabar Gaffney (left), a 6'1", 197-pound sophomore who has caught GO passes for 1,090 yards and 12 touchdowns.

"He's the first receiver I think of—talented and really good out of the Gators' base looks. Following the catch he's a fast runner and very slippery. I can't remember seeing him block. I've never seen a Florida receiver block. Scouts just figure that's one thing that [Gators coach Steve] Spurrier doesn't make his receivers do. I think he's coming out. If he does, he'll go in the first round."

?BULLETIN BOARD
"Levron Williams is scared to run up the middle on us. He's going to try to bounce outside and be a pretty boy. He doesn't want any piece of us."
A comment by Purdue defensive tackle Matt Mitrione that appeared in the Lafayette ( Ind.) Journal and Courier and found its way onto Indiana's bulletin board last week. Williams ran for 94 yards, including a 52-yard touchdown, in a 13-7 win that earned the Hoosiers the Old Oaken Bucket.

?HEAD TO HEAD
Texas's red-zone offense against Colorado's red-zone defense
The Longhorns lead the Big 12 in scoring from inside the 20-yard line, with 39 touchdowns and nine field goals in 54 possessions. They also haven't turned the ball over in that area. The Buffaloes' defense finished last in the conference in stopping teams in the red zone, giving up 15 touchdowns and six field goals in 26 opponents' attempts. Texas's balanced offense, featuring tailback Cedric Benson and two jump-ball-catching wideouts, 6'5" Roy Williams and 6'2" Sloan Thomas, keeps defenses honest near the goal line. That trio had five touchdowns in the Longhorns' 41-7 defeat of Colorado on Oct. 20.

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