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Just the Two of Us
Franz Lidz
December 10, 2001
Making up for a lifetime apart, Lee and Tony Trevino enjoyed some long overdue quality time at the Father/Son Challenge
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December 10, 2001

Just The Two Of Us

Making up for a lifetime apart, Lee and Tony Trevino enjoyed some long overdue quality time at the Father/Son Challenge

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On the PGA Tour the son almost never rises. Only five pairs of fathers and sons have won Tour events, and none have won majors. Free lessons and equipment are about the only breaks that kids of pros receive. "Being the son of a famous golfer is a source of confidence when you're playing well," says Ron Stockton, 33, a retired mini-tour player who teamed with his father, Dave, to tie for seventh place. "When you're not, you sense the expectations of the people watching you. You're seen as so-and-so's kid, and then you go out, lay the sod over a shot and feel like an idiot. Eventually you find other things to do that make you feel good about yourself."

For Tony, the other thing was basketball. As a 5'7" guard he made all-district at Aubrey High, outside Denton, Texas. The school had no golf team, and Tony didn't take the sport seriously again until he enrolled at North Texas State (now the University of North Texas). However, two weeks before the start of the season he tried to break up a street fight and wound up breaking his right arm in three places. The injury required two steel plates and 13 screws. "Before I even had a college career," says Tony, "it was over."

At 21 Tony dropped out of school to become a full-time golf instructor, working for six years under Hank Haney in McKinney, Texas. Since 1995 he has been the director of instruction at San Antonio's Golf Club of Texas, a course designed by his father. "I watch eight hours of bad swings, hit balls for a half hour and then go home to my wife and daughter," Tony says of his life. He hates leaving home, which is why he considers the injury something of a blessing. "If not for that broken arm, I'd probably be out on the Hooters tour, struggling to get my card."

Lee credits his wife with straightening out his priorities. "Claudia showed me there's a life outside golf," he says, "and that I should enjoy it." Having promised her that he'd be a practicing parent, he often brings his two youngsters along on the Senior tour. "Olivia and Lee are beneficiaries of the mistakes I made with Tony," says Lee. "It's important that my little kids know me."

What Tony knows best about Lee is his swing, a loopy lunge that contradicts every textbook except for his own. Although the self-taught Lee sometimes seeks Tony's advice on form, he doesn't necessarily follow it. "I'll hire a teacher only when I find one who can beat me," he says, repeating a line he has used for decades to underscore his disdain for swing coaches. "Tony's sharp and knows his golf, but he forgets how many trophies this old man has won."

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