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December 17, 2001
Offered?Four seats behind the dugout for any 2002 Twins game, in an auction to support Minnesota's Children's Theatre Company. The tickets were donated by Dorsey & Whitney, the Minneapolis law firm representing Major League Baseball in its effort to eliminate the Twins through contraction. There were no takers.
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December 17, 2001

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Offered
?Four seats behind the dugout for any 2002 Twins game, in an auction to support Minnesota's Children's Theatre Company. The tickets were donated by Dorsey & Whitney, the Minneapolis law firm representing Major League Baseball in its effort to eliminate the Twins through contraction. There were no takers.

Requested
?By the Canadian group Democracy Watch, a review of a ruling by the country's ethics counselor that Prime Minister Jean Chr�tien's round of golf with Tiger Woods in the Bell Canadian Open Pro-Am didn't constitute an improper gift from Bell Canada, the event's sponsor. Democracy Watch contends the round was worth at least $13,000.

Tested
?A "windscreen" attached to the chain-link fence behind the Wrigley Field bleachers, obscuring the view of the field from the rooftops on Waveland and Sheffield avenues. Tribune Company, the Cubs' owner, wants to expand bleacher seating, a move opposed by owners of the buildings, who charge membership fees to watch games from their roofs. Team exec Mark McGuire told the Chicago Tribune he thinks people might find the windscreen "an aesthetic improvement to the ballpark."

Approved
?By the California Horse Racing Board, advertising on jockey uniforms and owners' silks. The largest permissible ad will be 32 square inches on the jockey's thigh or chest.

Bubbling
?With joy, sports fans, over news that a U.S.-Belgian research team had discovered why exposure to light causes beer to become skunky, and that British and U.S. scientists had identified how a certain enzyme makes fat accumulate around the abdomen. The findings offer hope that couch potatoes may some day enjoy fresh malt beverages without developing a beer gut.

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