SI Vault
 
O.B.
January 28, 2002
Think Tiger Woods already is omni-present? Just wait. "Our goal is to make Tiger as much a part of bar culture as a jukebox and a pool table," says Bob Cooney, VP of business development for Global VR, a San Jose-based manufacturer of coin-operated arcade games that this spring will introduce a barroom spinoff of the popular PC-based video game EA Sports Tiger Woods PGA Tour. A long overdue competitor to the ubiquitous Golden Tee Golf—which has made a watering hole hero out of Peter Jacobsen, of all people—Tiger Woods features a trackball interface, which allows players to fade or draw shots, and brings an element of power to the game. Woods's four-year deal with Global VR is a paltry (for him) $750,000 per, but the eponymous protagonist will, according to Cooney, enjoy profit participation. As many as 100,000 machines could be distributed, all with built-in modems allowing sodden enthusiasts to be linked in an on-line tournament. Cooney estimates that as many as five million players could compete for a $1 million purse, at $5 apiece, which is where Woods would cash in.
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
January 28, 2002

O.b.

View CoverRead All Articles

Think Tiger Woods already is omni-present? Just wait. "Our goal is to make Tiger as much a part of bar culture as a jukebox and a pool table," says Bob Cooney, VP of business development for Global VR, a San Jose-based manufacturer of coin-operated arcade games that this spring will introduce a barroom spinoff of the popular PC-based video game EA Sports Tiger Woods PGA Tour. A long overdue competitor to the ubiquitous Golden Tee Golf—which has made a watering hole hero out of Peter Jacobsen, of all people—Tiger Woods features a trackball interface, which allows players to fade or draw shots, and brings an element of power to the game. Woods's four-year deal with Global VR is a paltry (for him) $750,000 per, but the eponymous protagonist will, according to Cooney, enjoy profit participation. As many as 100,000 machines could be distributed, all with built-in modems allowing sodden enthusiasts to be linked in an on-line tournament. Cooney estimates that as many as five million players could compete for a $1 million purse, at $5 apiece, which is where Woods would cash in.

Last week at the Hope, Kirk Triplett's name was misspelled TRIPRETT on the back of his golf bag. "I'm sure the guy stitching it got a phone call in the middle of the job," Triplett says.

Miami attorney Jack Thompson is organizing a boycott of the Golf Channel in protest of its removal of popular on-air talent Peter Kessler. Thompson—who was named Arts Co-Censor of the Year in 1992 by the ACLU for his work in getting rapper Ice-T's controversial song Cop Killer pulled from record stores—claims he has had no contact with Kessler and is merely an outraged viewer pining for his favorite host. "I'd like Peter to get his chair back," says Thompson, who can be reached at jackthompson@mediaone.net, "or, at the very least, hit the Golf Channel upside the head for treating him like crap." It's a mad, mad world.

Actor Joe Pesci on playing in the same group at the Hope with 'NSync heartthrob Justin Timberlake (above): "Some parents offered me up to $200 to get an autograph for their kid," Pesci said on Saturday. "They haven't come up with the right number yet, but if they do, they'll get it."

1