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Blotter
March 04, 2002
Recycled?The feud between Lance Armstrong and 1998 Tour de France winner Marco Pantani. "He is a great rider, but not a great champion. He's clever at making the most of his sickness," Pantani told a Madrid paper, referring to the three-time Tour champ's successful battle against testicular cancer.
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March 04, 2002

Blotter

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Recycled
?The feud between Lance Armstrong and 1998 Tour de France winner Marco Pantani. "He is a great rider, but not a great champion. He's clever at making the most of his sickness," Pantani told a Madrid paper, referring to the three-time Tour champ's successful battle against testicular cancer.

Explained
?Why climbers pass gas at high altitudes. According to a recent report in the U.S. journal High Altitude Medicine and Biology, mountaineers who climb higher than 11,000 feet are susceptible to a condition called High Altitude Flatus Expulsion, or fits of violent flatulence, because the stomach's resistance to the expansion of gas is reduced.

Delayed
? MSNBC's report on the death of Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl. The cable station waited 40 minutes after CBS first reported the news so that it would not interrupt the gold medal curling match between Switzerland and Great Britain. "Obviously, if there's something of the magnitude of Sept. 11, we'll cut into coverage," says MSNBC spokesman Mark O'Connor, "but this didn't warrant it."

Died
?Willie Thrower, the first black quarterback in NFL history, of a heart attack at age 71. Thrower played his first and last game in the league with the Bears on Oct. 18,1953, completing 3 of 8 passes in a loss to the 49ers. It would be 15 years before another black quarterback took a snap in an NFL game.

Knackered
?British golfer Colin Montgomerie, by heckling at U.S. events. Claiming he was taunted by fans during his loss to Scott McCarron at last week's the Match Play Championship, Montgomerie said he likely won't play in any U.S. events after 2002. "There's only one thing worse than losing, and that's spending another day in your country," Montgomerie snapped at a fan.

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