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the Beat
March 25, 2002
From HBO—the network that has brought you shows about dysfunctional families (The Sopranos), sexually empowered women (Sex and the City), and empty-headed sports figures (Arli$$)—comes Baseball Wives, a series with elements of all three. Wives, which portrays the trials of being married to a major leaguer, was created by Michelle Grace, the ex-wife of Diamondbacks first baseman Mark Grace. Michelle (below, with current husband, actor Ray Liotta) is an executive producer and will play one of the wives, as will actress Julie Warner (Family Law), who stars as Lorraine Bradley. "Lorraine's the queen bee bitch of the baseball wives," says Warner. "She's very controlling and very manipulative." Some story lines: a star rookie is caught by his wife in bed with a female journalist; the wife of a heartthrob player deals with her insecurities; and a player gets sent to the minors after his wife chastises the manager over her husband's lack of playing time. "It's an interesting culture," says Warner. "There's a lot of hair, a lot of makeup and a lot of nails going on. But underneath all that, they're human beings."
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March 25, 2002

The Beat

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From HBO—the network that has brought you shows about dysfunctional families ( The Sopranos), sexually empowered women ( Sex and the City), and empty-headed sports figures (Arli$$)—comes Baseball Wives, a series with elements of all three. Wives, which portrays the trials of being married to a major leaguer, was created by Michelle Grace, the ex-wife of Diamondbacks first baseman Mark Grace. Michelle (below, with current husband, actor Ray Liotta) is an executive producer and will play one of the wives, as will actress Julie Warner (Family Law), who stars as Lorraine Bradley. "Lorraine's the queen bee bitch of the baseball wives," says Warner. "She's very controlling and very manipulative." Some story lines: a star rookie is caught by his wife in bed with a female journalist; the wife of a heartthrob player deals with her insecurities; and a player gets sent to the minors after his wife chastises the manager over her husband's lack of playing time. "It's an interesting culture," says Warner. "There's a lot of hair, a lot of makeup and a lot of nails going on. But underneath all that, they're human beings."

...The shake-up at Monday Night Football, in which Dennis Miller, Dan Fouts and Eric Dickerson got booted, also claimed the lesser-known Locke Peterseim. For the last two seasons, Peterseim, a freelance writer from Chicago, has written the Annotated Dennis Miller, a popular feature that ran on the Brittanica.com and the Monday Night Football websites. Each week Peterseim's columns broke down Miller's wide-ranging pop cultural references, explaining what Miller meant when he compared the quality of games to "Ripple, Thunder-bird and Boone's Farm" (three cheap wines made by Ernest and Julio Gallo), or when he said "that hit was later than Godot" (a reference to Samuel Beckett's Waiting for Godot). "When I started, I wasn't a football fan," says Peterseim. "Now it eats up most of my Sundays. My postmortem on Miller was that he got people like me interested in football."

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