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THE BLOTTER
July 15, 2002
NamedAs manager, by the Atlantic League's Atlantic City Surf, former Phillies pitcher Mitch (Wild Thing) Williams. Best known for giving up a World Series-winning home run to Toronto's Joe Carter in 1993, Williams, 37, served as the Surf's pitching coach, as well as an occasional pitcher, before the hiring.
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July 15, 2002

The Blotter

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Named
As manager, by the Atlantic League's Atlantic City Surf, former Phillies pitcher Mitch (Wild Thing) Williams. Best known for giving up a World Series-winning home run to Toronto's Joe Carter in 1993, Williams, 37, served as the Surf's pitching coach, as well as an occasional pitcher, before the hiring.

Challenged
By Ukrainian contender Wladimir Klitschko, heavyweight champion Lennox Lewis, to a game of chess. Klitschko, who holds a Ph.D. in physical education, has enlisted Professional Chess Association champion Garry Kasparov as his cornerman. "Never have two champions played chess before the fight," says the 39-1 Klitschko, who also wants to face Lewis in the ring.

Released
From jail, in Ventura County, Calif., Hall of Fame running back Jim Brown, after serving less than four months of a six-month sentence for vandalizing his wife's car in 1999. Brown, 66, was originally sentenced to a year of domestic violence counseling, a $1,800 fine and a choice of 40 hours on a work crew or 400 hours of community service. When he refused counseling, Brown was ordered by a municipal court judge to serve the jail term.

Died
Pete Gray, 87, who in 1945 played 77 games for the St. Louis Browns despite having lost his right arm when he fell under a truck at age six. Baseball's most famous wartime replacement, Gray was acquired by the Browns for $20,000 after he was named MVP of the Southern Association while with the Memphis Chicks. Gray made his big league debut on April 18, 1945, and went 1 for 4 in a 7-1 win over Detroit. He finished the season with a .218 batting average. (An outfielder, Gray would catch a fly, tuck his glove under his stump, roll the ball across his chest and throw.) Gray was sent down after the '45 season when players returned from military service; he played in the minors and for barnstorming teams into the '50s before retiring to Nanicoke, Pa. A 1986 television movie (A Winner Never Quits) was made about his life.

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