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THE BLOTTER
August 05, 2002
DiedOf complications from diabetes, Mel Triplett, 71, the starting fullback on the Giants' 1956 NFL title team. The lead blocker for Frank Gifford, Triplett played six seasons for the Giants before ending his career in Minnesota. He rushed for 2,856 career yards.
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August 05, 2002

The Blotter

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Died
Of complications from diabetes, Mel Triplett, 71, the starting fullback on the Giants' 1956 NFL title team. The lead blocker for Frank Gifford, Triplett played six seasons for the Giants before ending his career in Minnesota. He rushed for 2,856 career yards.

?Of cancer, Pete Seibert, 77, visionary founder of the Vail ski resort on the site of what had been rolling sheep meadows in the Rockies. A member of the 10th Mountain Division during World War II, Seibert lost his right kneecap after he was hit with mortar fire, but he recovered to become a member of the U.S. ski team in 1950. Seibert opened Vail in '62, relying on two chair lifts and eight instructors. He was the resort's top executive until the 1970s and was serving as a full-time adviser at the time of his death.

?Of cancer, Jana Elway-Sever, 42, the twin sister of former Broncos quarterback John Elway. Born II minutes after her brother, Jana played tennis for San Jose State and later became a grade school teacher.

Signed
By Adidas, Bulls rookie guard Jay Williams, the second overall pick in the 2002 NBA draft. The multiyear deal is said to be worth more than $750,000 a year; Williams signed 10 days after Kobe Bryant ended a six-year sponsorship agreement with the company.

Distributed
By the Class A Delmarva Shorebirds, Frank Perdue bobblehead dolls, to the first 1,000 fans who attended their game against the Charleston (W.Va.) Alley Cats on Sunday. The giveaway, which was concocted by The Daily Times newspaper in Salisbury, Md., honored the chicken mogul's financial contributions to the Shorebirds.

Booted
By security guards, from the Redskins' training camp at Dickinson College, five children who were selling drinks and cookies to fans. The youngsters, ages seven to II, were made to abandon their stand near the field's entrance because Dickinson officials feared being held responsible if anyone got sick from the food the kids were selling.

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