SI Vault
 
DON GUTTERIDGE
August 26, 2002
Why you should know his nameWith the recent death of Enos Slaughter, Gutteridge, 90, is the last surviving alum of the Gashouse Gang, as the scrappy St. Louis Cardinals were known in the mid-to-late 1930s.
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
August 26, 2002

Don Gutteridge

View CoverRead All Articles

Why you should know his name
With the recent death of Enos Slaughter, Gutteridge, 90, is the last surviving alum of the Gashouse Gang, as the scrappy St. Louis Cardinals were known in the mid-to-late 1930s.

Where he fits in the lore of Dizzy, Ducky, Pepper and the Lip
The nicknameless native of Pittsburg, Kans., broke in with the Gashousers in 1936, two seasons after they had won the World Series, and soon replaced Pepper Martin at third. The 5'11", 165-pound Gutteridge played with the Cards through 1940 and embodied their hustling style in his 12-year career, hitting .256 with 39 homers and 95 steals. He went on to manage the White Sox in '69 and 70 and scouted for nearly 40 years.

The book on him
His new autobiography, Don Gutteridge: In Words and Pictures, tells how he learned the headfirst slide from Martin and visited Sing Sing prison's electric chair with teammate Lon Warneke. "You go behind those bars," Gutteridge says. "It gives you second thoughts."

1