SI Vault
 
Gender Flap
Austin Murphy
September 23, 2002
Compassion was not my initial response to the news that a transgender mountain biker was creating a stir in Canada. My initial response was gratitude, as in, Thank you, God, for the easiest column I will write this year. Sure, there would be a few gray areas with pronouns. But here was a column whose kicker practically composed itself. Whether you agree with her or not, you have to admit: What she did took balls.
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
September 23, 2002

Gender Flap

View CoverRead All Articles
1 2

Not everyone gave her such a frosty reception. "Goddam!" said U.S. downhiller Missy Giove, who came in third in Austria. "If you're here, it must be 2002!

"I stand for acceptance and open-mindedness," continued the voluble Missile, who is gay. "If she says she doesn't have a competitive advantage, then I believe her." Rather than whisper behind her back, Giove peppered Dumaresq with questions. "You'll have to excuse my ignorance," Giove said at one point. "I don't meet a lot of transsexuals in my line of work."

Dumaresq is happy to tell her story. She wants to educate people on transgender issues, even as she herself makes new discoveries. She had no idea, for instance, that the hormones she takes would affect the way she thinks. But that has happened, she insists. On a recent training ride she and some guy friends came across a new jump on one of their regular trails. While the four guys in front of her took the jump without hesitation, Dumaresq got off her bike, then had this exchange with the guy behind her:

"What are you doing?" the guy asked.

"Checking out the landing."

"Friggin' girl."

1 2