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Letters
September 30, 2002
Coach ChuckyThank you, S.L Price, for showing Jon Gruden's true colors (Coach Chucky, Sept. 9). I had the pleasure of being Jon's teammate for two years at Dayton. No one on those Flyers teams worked harder than Jon. He spent countless hours studying film, lifting weights and perfecting his technique. Jon Gruden is no ham-and-egger.KEVIN BUCHANAN, Roswell, Ga.
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September 30, 2002

Letters

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Coach Chucky
Thank you, S.L Price, for showing Jon Gruden's true colors (Coach Chucky, Sept. 9). I had the pleasure of being Jon's teammate for two years at Dayton. No one on those Flyers teams worked harder than Jon. He spent countless hours studying film, lifting weights and perfecting his technique. Jon Gruden is no ham-and-egger.
KEVIN BUCHANAN, Roswell, Ga.

When is someone going to ask Jon Gruden why he was willing to join a team that had just given up its first-and second-round draft choices for 2002, a first-rounder in 2003 and its second-round pick in 2004?
TIM BLASER, Green Bay

Gruden might be the best NFL coach, but he sounds like a bad husband and father. His wife may not mind not having him around, but what about their boys?
SHARON STEELHAMMER
Clyde, Calif.

I had no problem identifying "Chucky" Gruden, but I was surprised by the identity of the player standing behind him. I guess I had never seen Warren Sapp with his mouth shut.
GENE JENKINS, Sun City Center, Fla.

A-Rod's Net Worth
Alex Rodriguez is undoubtedly one of the best players in baseball and a wonderful person (The Lone Ranger, Sept. 9), but the fact remains he chose money over the chance to compete for a championship. He's no MVP. Unlike Ernie Banks, he had a choice.
DONALD J. CALICCHIA, Rome, N.Y.

He's a great baseball player. He works hard. He's intelligent. He feels a responsibility toward his teammates, fans and management. I'm beginning to think he's a bargain.
SHANNON MURPHY, Lakeside Park, Ky.

The true test of any person's ability is his performance under pressure in a leadership role. Would A-Rod have delivered in the heat of a pennant race the same way Miguel Tejada did in back-to-back games with a walk-off home run and a walk-off single? It's a shame we may never know.
COREY ZDANAVAGE, Cave Creek, Ariz.

The description of Rodriguez's servants and bodyguards surrounding him in his mansion make him sound like the CEO of A-Rod Inc.
GLENN RIFKIN, Acton, Mass.

Courageous Koufax
The excerpt from Jane Leavy's book, Sandy Koufax: A Lefty's Legacy (The Chosen One, Sept. 9), brought back the time when people all over the world talked about and followed the exploits of Koufax and Don Drysdale. What I found so disturbing was the open bigotry of teammates, coaches, rival players, sports-writers and members of the Dodgers organization. In my naivet´┐Ż I had always assumed that Koufax was an American, pure and simple. What shabby treatment for one of the truly great players of all time.
ROBERT G. BETHEL, Tucson

As someone who was privileged to see Koufax pitch, I was always struck by his unique combination of immense power and absolute fragility. His dominance and his vulnerability, and his grace in never publicly acknowledging either, are what made his career so special and the memory of his prowess so sweet.
SAM LUDU, Baldwin, N.Y.

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