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October 21, 2002
Tyrone's Power S.L. Price captured the strength and magic of Tyrone Willingham's character (The Savior of South Bend, Sept. 30). The man is as advertised. When I was a student manager in the football program at Michigan State, I saw this same character displayed on a daily basis. He was tiny, but he walked on and became our starter at quarterback. A new coaching staff determined that he was too small to run a high-powered passing offense, so Ty simply switched to wide receiver and became a major contributor. As a Spartans fan I would rather stick needles in my eyes than support the Golden Domers, but Ty has spoiled the fun of hating Notre Dame.JEFF MINAHAN, Olney, Md.
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October 21, 2002

Letters

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Tyrone's Power
S.L. Price captured the strength and magic of Tyrone Willingham's character (The Savior of South Bend, Sept. 30). The man is as advertised. When I was a student manager in the football program at Michigan State, I saw this same character displayed on a daily basis. He was tiny, but he walked on and became our starter at quarterback. A new coaching staff determined that he was too small to run a high-powered passing offense, so Ty simply switched to wide receiver and became a major contributor. As a Spartans fan I would rather stick needles in my eyes than support the Golden Domers, but Ty has spoiled the fun of hating Notre Dame.
JEFF MINAHAN, Olney, Md.

If just two plays had gone differently, Notre Dame would have lost to both Michigan and Michigan State. In that case the Fighting Irish would be 2-2, and no one—outside his immediate family—would be singing the praises of Coach Willingham. In the land of Touchdown Jesus, Willing-ham may turn out to be a savior, but after four games it is way too early to tell.
RICHARD McCARTAN, Olympia, Wash.

Please give the rest of the country a break and realize there are other college football games being played in America.
CHARLES PHILLIPS, Everett, Wash.

Value Added
Regarding your choice of Alfonso Soriano as the American League MVP (Value Judgment, Sept. 30), please consider this: Without Soriano, the Yankees would have finished in first place; without A-Rod, the Rangers would still be last; but without Miguel Tejada, the A's might have finished third. That is a true test of an MVP—not just stats, but leadership and teamwork. Tejada deserves a closer look.
GAYLE O'HARA, Sonoma, Calif.

How can you not include Magglio Ordonez in the top 10 AL MVP candidates? He ended the season fifth in batting average, second in RBIs, sixth in home runs, fourth in doubles, sixth in runs scored, third in total bases and fifth in slugging percentage. Without him the White Sox would not have finished second in their division.
GEORGE P. NASSOS
Glenview, Ill.

Disregarding salary issues, is there any player in the league that a team would not trade straight-up for Alex Rodriguez?
ROGER F. ASSAD, Montebello, N.Y.

Holding Fast
The most poignant aspect of your story on Bob Hayes (Sept. 30) was the photo you ran of Hayes in later life, haggard but still displaying both his gold medal and Super Bowl ring. Despite his missteps he obviously had enough self-respect to honor and keep those tokens of accomplishment.
SCOTT LENZ, Los Angeles

Admit One
While I like all of Dr. Z's possibilities (Hall Worthy, Sept. 30), until Alex Karras is enshrined, no one else should be.
JOHN A. DOUGLAS, Lebanon, Ind.

Canton's most glaring omission is Billy Wilson, a 1950s standout 49ers receiver. Wilson was All-Pro six times, won the Pro Bowl MVP award in '55 and, at 6'3", 190 pounds, was one of the NFL's first true big, fast and agile outside receivers. He retired in '60 with 407 catches, second only to the incomparable Don Hutson and well ahead of Hall enshrinees Pete Pihos, Tom Fears, Dante Lavelli and Elroy Hirsch. And, as a longtime 49ers assistant and scout, he had a role in drafting Jerry Rice.
LOUIS LAMPSON, Basking Ridge, N.J.

Sportainment?
Vince McMahon's response to SI's inquiry on the decline of the WWE (SCORECARD, Sept. 30) showed exactly what's wrong with wrestling today: "Why is a sports magazine interested in an entertainment story?" The day McMahon stopped "pretending" that professional wrestling is a sport was the day wrestling lost its mainstream acceptance and started down a long road to alienating its faithful fans. I watch wrestling for the unique combination of athletic competition and entertainment. If I want to watch strictly "entertainment," I'll change the channel to The Sopranos, full of more-talented actors and far better writing.
JEROD STORY, Yuma, Ariz.

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