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O.B.
March 31, 2003
David Eger, the 51-year-old who won last month's MasterCard Classic in Mexico City, has taken a circuitous route to senior stardom. He spent most of the 1990s in administrative positions with the PGA Tour and the USGA, and that has made for some awkward interactions since joining the Champions last year. "Let's just say these guys remembered me as a rules official, not as a player," says Eger, who finished 13th at last week's Toshiba Senior Classic, eight strokes behind winner Rodger Davis. "I never had success on the regular Tour, so I wasn't really one of them. I wasn't welcome, but I wasn't unwelcome. I was just...acknowledged." Not that his old jobs haven't come in handy. "It's happened a couple of times that someone in my group needs a ruling, and they radio for an official," he says. "Then the official will say something like, 'Well, David's right there. Just have him do it.' "
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March 31, 2003

O.b.

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David Eger, the 51-year-old who won last month's MasterCard Classic in Mexico City, has taken a circuitous route to senior stardom. He spent most of the 1990s in administrative positions with the PGA Tour and the USGA, and that has made for some awkward interactions since joining the Champions last year. "Let's just say these guys remembered me as a rules official, not as a player," says Eger, who finished 13th at last week's Toshiba Senior Classic, eight strokes behind winner Rodger Davis. "I never had success on the regular Tour, so I wasn't really one of them. I wasn't welcome, but I wasn't unwelcome. I was just...acknowledged." Not that his old jobs haven't come in handy. "It's happened a couple of times that someone in my group needs a ruling, and they radio for an official," he says. "Then the official will say something like, 'Well, David's right there. Just have him do it.' "

?From the It Had to Be Fuzzy Dept.: During the first round of last week's Toshiba, Fuzzy Zoeller entertained a sizable gallery with his unique brand of humor. "How do you get an Iraqi to stop playing bingo?" Zoeller asked. Answer: "Have someone yell, ' B-52!' "

?During the third round of last week's Madeira Island Open, Bradley Dredge of Wales had two chances to become the first man to shoot 59 on the European tour, but he missed birdie putts of 11 and 30 feet on the final two holes. Dredge, the only player in the top 100 of the World Ranking to show up for the $635,000 event, went on to earn his first victory, by eight strokes.

?Achy touring pros may have to start looking elsewhere for their rubdowns. Last week HealthSouth, the Birmingham health-care company that provides fitness facilities for all three PGA tours, was slapped with charges of "massive accounting fraud" by the Securities and Exchange Commission, including accusations that the company inflated earnings by as much as $1.4 billion.

? PGA Tour Productions is naming the videotape library in its offices in St. Augustine, Fla., after Brian Blodgett, the veteran cameraman who was killed last September when the forklift he was perched atop toppled over while filming a Shell's Wonderful World of Golf match in Carmel Valley, Calif. (SI, Sept. 16, 2002).

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