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FOR THE RECORD
April 14, 2003
DiedAfter a long battle with emphysema, while sleeping in his office chair, handball legend Paul Haber, 66. The Bronx native, who won five national four-wall championships from 1966 through '71, dubbed himself "the greatest Jewish athlete in the world." The first player to use the ceiling to drop a soft shot, he was also known for his drinking, skirt chasing and chain-smoking. "It's what most guys want to do, only they won't admit it," Haber said of his lifestyle. Until his death, Haber, who had been married four times and was estranged from his three children, was a petrochemical salesman living in an apartment adjacent to his office outside San Diego. A collection had to be taken to pay for his funeral—his cat, some cat food and the $42 in his wallet were all he had to his name.
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April 14, 2003

For The Record

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Died
After a long battle with emphysema, while sleeping in his office chair, handball legend Paul Haber, 66. The Bronx native, who won five national four-wall championships from 1966 through '71, dubbed himself "the greatest Jewish athlete in the world." The first player to use the ceiling to drop a soft shot, he was also known for his drinking, skirt chasing and chain-smoking. "It's what most guys want to do, only they won't admit it," Haber said of his lifestyle. Until his death, Haber, who had been married four times and was estranged from his three children, was a petrochemical salesman living in an apartment adjacent to his office outside San Diego. A collection had to be taken to pay for his funeral—his cat, some cat food and the $42 in his wallet were all he had to his name.

Resigned
Bulls general manager Jerry Krause, architect of the team's six NBA titles. Though many Chicago players—who weren't fond of his abrasive, egotistical style—called the 5'6", 220-pound Krause "Crumbs" for the doughnut residue often spotted on his lapels, Krause also earned the nickname Sleuth for his knack for spotting talent. Before being hired as Bulls G.M. in 1985, Krause spent two decades as a scout for teams in the NBA and major league baseball. When he took over the Bulls, they had a 22-year-old Michael Jordan and little else. Krause assembled a supporting cast that twice won three straight NBA titles. But Krause's relationship with coach Phil Jackson deteriorated, and in '98 Jackson resigned. That prompted Jordan to retire, and the Bulls (27-50 this year) haven't made the playoffs since. Krause, 64, cited unspecified health concerns for his resignation.

Hooked
By New Zealand fishermen while hunting for Patagonian toothfish in Antarctica's Ross Sea, a 330-pound, 16-foot colossal squid. "They were hauling in the fish, and they saw this giant thing attacking their catch, so they gaffed it and dragged it on board," said Steve O'Shea, a marine biologist who examined the squid. Only the second of its kind ever caught, the creature has giant tentacles with enormous toothlike hooks and the largest eyes—they're the size of dinner plates—of any animal. The fishermen gave the female specimen to the Te Papa national museum in New Zealand for research. "This is a killer squid," said O'Shea. "From a science point of view, it's absolutely priceless."

Feared
By some Iraqi athletes, that evidence of Saddam Hussein's policy of torturing them and fellow athletes was destroyed when U.S. bombs struck Iraq's National Olympic Committee headquarters in Baghdad on March 31. INDICT, a human-rights group, submitted a complaint to the IOC on behalf of the athletes in December, but proof that Uday Hussein, Saddam's oldest son and head of Iraq's Olympic committee (SI, March 24, 2003), used the seven-story building as a place to beat, humiliate and murder athletes may be lost in the rubble.

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