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The Cup Cometh Over?
Grant Wahl
May 19, 2003
If the U.S. hosts the Women's World Cup this fall, as is expected following FIFA's decision to move it from China due to SARS, one effect is clear: The Americans will have a much better chance of winning. The U.S. has won both major women's tournaments held on home soil—The '96 Olympics and the '99 Cup (left). Yet questions remain. Will FIFA cover American organizers' losses, projected to be as much as $10 million? (Probably.) Will sports fans divert their gaze from baseball and football to watch? (Doubtful, unless the U.S. makes the final.) And will the WUSA get a much-needed jolt from the tournament? (Perhaps, though its fourth season won't start until five months later.) Ultimately, it's a good thing for American soccer that the tournament appears to be returning to these shores. Just don't expect the spectacle of 1999.
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May 19, 2003

The Cup Cometh Over?

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If the U.S. hosts the Women's World Cup this fall, as is expected following FIFA's decision to move it from China due to SARS, one effect is clear: The Americans will have a much better chance of winning. The U.S. has won both major women's tournaments held on home soil—The '96 Olympics and the '99 Cup (left). Yet questions remain. Will FIFA cover American organizers' losses, projected to be as much as $10 million? (Probably.) Will sports fans divert their gaze from baseball and football to watch? (Doubtful, unless the U.S. makes the final.) And will the WUSA get a much-needed jolt from the tournament? (Perhaps, though its fourth season won't start until five months later.) Ultimately, it's a good thing for American soccer that the tournament appears to be returning to these shores. Just don't expect the spectacle of 1999.

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