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Letters
May 26, 2003
Minority Report
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May 26, 2003

Letters

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Some of my coworkers are more influential sports figures than the people on your list. They are high school coaches.
RONALD REESE, San Diego

Sunil Gulati, executive vice president of U.S. Soccer's board of directors and chairman of its technical committee, has the ear of everyone in the sport and served as the deputy commissioner for the first four years of Major League Soccer.
STEVEN VANDERPOOL, Pasadena

Kobe and LeBron might not have had the option of going pro if not for the influence of Moses Malone and Kevin Garnett.
SAM WILKENING, Grandville, Mich.

Michelle Kwan is the most decorated U.S. figure skater in history. She has greatly influenced her sport on and off the ice—and she is still only 22 years old!
LYNN MARTALOCK, Tomah, Wis.

I was intrigued by your top pick of Robert Johnson as he attempts to bring a successful NBA franchise back to Charlotte, but you omitted track star Marion Jones. In fact, track stars didn't emerge on your radar screen at all. Jones represents a powerful force in an all-too-often-neglected sport.
RICHARD S. GREENE, Cary, N.C.

How can you include Yao Ming, who is a member of the most populous ethnic group on earth?
GARY B. BERNS, Bradenton, Fla.

To include Johnnie Cochran on your influential minorities list and leave out Muhammad Ali is simply a crime.
BILL KIEFER, Fort Worth, Texas

Magic ranked below folks like Bill Duffy and Venus Williams? At least you put him ahead of Charles Barkley.
RALPH S. BRAX, Lancaster, Calif.

Any list of influential minorities should include Bill Russell, an inspiration to all as the first African-American to be a head coach in the NBA.
GENE WALSH, Burbank, Calif.

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