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FOR THE RECORD
June 02, 2003
ReceivedA taste of what it would be like to be covered by the English press, Metrostars and U.S. national team goalkeeper Tim Howard. Last week Manchester United made an inquiry to MLS about signing the 24-year-old, who has allowed just four goals in seven games this season—and who also has been diagnosed with Tourette's syndrome. The headline writers on Fleet Street, who delight in taking potshots at the Premier League champs, had a field day. UNITED WANT AMERICAN WITH BRAIN DISORDER said The Guardian of London; The Independent wrote MANCHESTER UNITED TRYING TO SIGN DISABLED GOALKEEPER. The always tasteful Mirror went with TICK FOR TIM.
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June 02, 2003

For The Record

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Received
A taste of what it would be like to be covered by the English press, Metrostars and U.S. national team goalkeeper Tim Howard. Last week Manchester United made an inquiry to MLS about signing the 24-year-old, who has allowed just four goals in seven games this season—and who also has been diagnosed with Tourette's syndrome. The headline writers on Fleet Street, who delight in taking potshots at the Premier League champs, had a field day. UNITED WANT AMERICAN WITH BRAIN DISORDER said The Guardian of London; The Independent wrote MANCHESTER UNITED TRYING TO SIGN DISABLED GOALKEEPER. The always tasteful Mirror went with TICK FOR TIM.

Resigned
After six seasons in Philadelphia, 76ers coach Larry Brown. Since the Sixers were eliminated by Detroit in the second round of the playoffs, Brown, 62, had talked of the possibility of stepping down. In 31 years of coaching seven pro teams and two colleges—including the University of Kansas, where he won an NCAA championship in 1988—the peripatetic Brown never stayed in one place longer than he did in Philadelphia, where he coached the Sixers to five straight postseason appearances. "We had a good run," said Brown. "I think it's time to get somebody else in here to maybe give a fresh look." Brown will be a candidate to fill head coaching jobs in Cleveland and in Houston, where Rudy Tomjanovich resigned earlier in the week.

Astounded
Doctors for former Louisiana State basketball coach Dale Brown, 67, who suffered a stroke on April 24. The colorful Brown, who after he retired in 1997 made two trips to Canada to find Bigfoot and who was planning to travel to Turkey to search for Noah's Ark, was at his home in Baton Rouge when a sharp pain in his back drove him to his knees. Brown was rushed to the hospital, where doctors told his wife, Vonnie, and his daughter, Robyn, that his right carotid artery was 95% blocked. Doctors put Brown, who was slurring his speech and had weakness in his left arm and leg and drooping on the left side of his face, on blood thinners and expected his condition to become permanent. "In 99 percent of the cases the artery totally closes up and the patient can no longer move their entire side," says Brown's cardiologist, Dr. Carl Luikart. Within a few days, however, the artery had cleared and Brown's condition had returned to normal. Says Luikart, "I have never heard of a case like this." Brown can't explain it either. "There's no way," he says, "that it wasn't a miracle."

Died
Of natural causes, Frank Ivy, 87 the only man to serve as a head coach in the NFL, the AFL and the CFL. As a prematurely balding All-America end at Oklahoma in the late 1930s, Ivy was given the nickname he would keep throughout his career: Pop. He began coaching in 1948 as an assistant at Oklahoma and earned a reputation as an offensive innovator with formations such as the Lonesome Quarterback, a forerunner of the shotgun. As head coach of the Edmonton Eskimos in the 1950s, he won three straight Grey Cups running the triple wing T, a variation of Oklahoma's vaunted split T. Ivy left in 1958 to coach the Chicago Cardinals, but a suspect defense kept him from success. His final head coaching job was with the Houston Oilers, whom he led to the 1963 AFL title game, only to lose to the Dallas Texans in double overtime.

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