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SPORTS BEAT
October 13, 2003
To the list of Cosmo girls—Cindy Crawford, Christy Turlington, et al.—now add the name of Adair Howell. The middle hitter on the Centre College (Ky.) volleyball team beat out over 5,000 contestants to win the magazine's nationwide cover model search. "I saw the contest on Entertainment Tonight and thought, Gosh, that's cool," says the 18-year-old freshman from Atlanta, who modeled extensively while helping the Westminster School to a state championship last year. "My agency insisted I enter. On the last day of entering, I came in with a disposable camera. An intern took pictures, and we took them to CVS and said, 'Please process the pictures first because we have to get them in the mail' " Howell—who graces the October issue alongside the usual headlines about finding your G-spot and bonding with a boyfriend—won a car, clothes and a year's supply of hair care products and makeup. (Since she was modeling before entering college, she didn't run afoul of the NCAA.) "Right now I'm just going through school and volleyball and waiting to see what comes up on the modeling side," says Howell.
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October 13, 2003

Sports Beat

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To the list of Cosmo girls—Cindy Crawford, Christy Turlington, et al.—now add the name of Adair Howell. The middle hitter on the Centre College (Ky.) volleyball team beat out over 5,000 contestants to win the magazine's nationwide cover model search. "I saw the contest on Entertainment Tonight and thought, Gosh, that's cool," says the 18-year-old freshman from Atlanta, who modeled extensively while helping the Westminster School to a state championship last year. "My agency insisted I enter. On the last day of entering, I came in with a disposable camera. An intern took pictures, and we took them to CVS and said, 'Please process the pictures first because we have to get them in the mail' " Howell—who graces the October issue alongside the usual headlines about finding your G-spot and bonding with a boyfriend—won a car, clothes and a year's supply of hair care products and makeup. (Since she was modeling before entering college, she didn't run afoul of the NCAA.) "Right now I'm just going through school and volleyball and waiting to see what comes up on the modeling side," says Howell.

?As George Costanza, Jason Alexander perfected the role of the short, slow-witted bald man. Now Alexander is showing his range, tackling the role of a tall, quick-witted bald man: Tony Kornheiser, cohost, with Michael Wilbon, of ESPN's Pardon the Interruption. CBS is developing a sitcom called Shut Up and Listen, based on Kornheiser's columns in The Washington Post style section in which he writes about his home life. "You put your work out on the street and hope as many people read it as possible," says Kornheiser. "For someone to say, This could make a television show, well, how flattering is that?" Alexander's character will likely also do TV work, meaning there will be a Wilbonesque foil. (Says Kornheiser, "Isn't the perfect guy to play him Charles Barkley?") Kornheiser doesn't see himself scripting the show. "You know those varsity jackets with the leather sleeves and the logo of the show on the back? All I want out of it is one of those," he says. "And maybe TONY stitched on the front."

?Hornets guard Baron Davis is serious about his second career as a movie exec. He went to Santa Monica's Crossroads High, renowned for its performing arts program (he graduated in the same class as Kate Hudson), and says, "I knew I wanted to eventually get into movies." The former UCLA star is a coproducer of Asylum, a dark romance that stars Sir Ian McKellan and Natasha Richardson and started filming last month. And Davis's film financing company, Too Easy Entertainment, recently purchased the right to remake the 1979 urban cult film Penitentiary. "This movie really teaches you something," says Davis, who has lined up investors and is now casting actors. "When you see it, you know prison is not a place you want to be."...

Katarina Witt has long been known for her provocative outfits, and her latest may land her in trouble with the German government. The skater has been threatened with prosecution for wearing a blouse with the logo of the Free German Youth, an organization set up by the communist regime in the former East German Republic to extol the virtues of socialism to kids. Witt, who represented East Germany when she won gold medals in the 1984 and '88 Olympics, wore the blouse while hosting her TV show, DDR Show, in which former East Germans reminisce about the country—sort of the German equivalent of VH1's I Love the '80s. Witt, 38, could face up to three years in prison for "parading symbols belonging to an organization which offends the constitution."

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