SI Vault
 
Q+A [WALTER RAY WILLIAMS JR.]
Richard Deitsch
November 24, 2003
At 44, the highest-earning bowler in PBA tour history ($3,151,571) rolls into this weekend's Empire State Open in Albany with 37 career wins—four shy of Earl Anthony's record.
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
November 24, 2003

Q+a [walter Ray Williams Jr.]

View CoverRead All Articles

At 44, the highest-earning bowler in PBA tour history ($3,151,571) rolls into this weekend's Empire State Open in Albany with 37 career wins—four shy of Earl Anthony's record.

SI: You graduated from Cal Poly-Pomona with a B.S. in physics. Ever had a fan come up and say they've read your 60-page college thesis, The Physics of a Bowling Ball Going Down the Lane?

Williams: I've had a few pro bowlers ask to see it, but most of them couldn't make heads or tails of it because some of the math is up there. I haven't had anybody come up to me and and say, "Wow, I really loved your thesis."

SI: If you end up passing Earl Anthony, would you be comfortable with people saying you're the greatest bowler of all time?

Williams: I consider Earl Anthony the greatest of all time even if I do pass him. He did what he did in 14 years [1970-83] on the tour, and this is my 21st year.

SI: How many bowling balls do you own?

Williams: About 50. I have 20 or 30 at home, and I take 25 with me on the road.

SI: In addition to bowling, you're a six-time horseshoe-pitching world champ and a two handicap in golf. Do bowlers get a bad rap for not being athletes?

Williams: A little bit. What is your definition of an athlete? Bowling is not physically as demanding as other sports, but it does have unique physical demands. You need arm, shoulder and knee strength, and you need to be able to be accurate, which is something a lot of athletes need.

SI: Can one make a career as a pro horseshoe pitcher?

Continue Story
1 2