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March 15, 2004
The Third ManSo Alex Rodriguez, the most spoiled player in baseball, gets his way and will play for George Steinbrenner, the sorest loser in baseball (Hello, New York, Feb. 23). Steinbrenner's purchasing power combined with his win-at-all-cost attitude seem as fair as hunting big game from an airplane. The Yankees' losing in the postseason to the Red Sox, Mets or Clemens-and-Pettitte-fortified Houston Astros would go a long way toward getting me through next winter. It would be even sweeter if the final game was in the Bronx.JON WRIGHTLandisville, Pa.
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March 15, 2004

Letters

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The Third Man
So Alex Rodriguez, the most spoiled player in baseball, gets his way and will play for George Steinbrenner, the sorest loser in baseball (Hello, New York, Feb. 23). Steinbrenner's purchasing power combined with his win-at-all-cost attitude seem as fair as hunting big game from an airplane. The Yankees' losing in the postseason to the Red Sox, Mets or Clemens-and-Pettitte-fortified Houston Astros would go a long way toward getting me through next winter. It would be even sweeter if the final game was in the Bronx.
JON WRIGHT
Landisville, Pa.

Maybe A-Rod can do for the Yankees what he did for the Rangers—make them a last-place team. We in Red Sox nation can only hope.
TED HAMER, Geneseo, Ill.

This future SI cover story is closer than you think: STEINBRENNER THAWS TED WILLIAMS, SIGNS HIM TO MULTI-YEAR DEAL.
MARK HILL, Antioch, Tenn.

Yanks for the Memories
Spare me the hype about A-Rod's trade to the Yankees; the departure of Andy Pettitte and Roger Clemens is the real story (The Home Team, Feb. 23). This Yankees team is woefully short on frontline pitching, and it will catch up to them. The Red Sox, in contrast, dramatically upgraded their pitching by acquiring Curt Schilling and Keith Foulke.
MIKE BERQUIST, Pittsburgh

Redd Alert
I was upset last week that the Milwaukee Bucks got no love in the NBA MID-SEASON REPORT (Feb. 16). Then I got my Feb. 23 issue in the mail and was treated to a story on Michael Redd (The Unexpected All-Star). Your account of Redd's long and largely unnoticed trek to the NBA All-Star Game showed why he is a great guy and a fun player to watch.
MATT MCCONLEY, Madison, Wis.

How is this possible? No earrings, no tattoos, no big necklaces—and he was an NBA All-Star? Bravo to you, Michael Redd. Thank you, SI and Chris Ballard, for writing about a player who should be a role model for youngsters.
MIKE STEVENS
Columbus, Ind.

Colorado Woes
The alleged actions of a group of Colorado players have done a disservice to the team, faculty, students, alums and themselves (Out of Control? Feb. 23). If the charges are proved true, the guilty parties should be disciplined. However, these alleged scandals do not diminish the positive actions and accomplishments of current or former Colorado students. Rick Reilly wrote he wants to "hide his class ring" because of the alleged abuses (THE LIFE OF REILLY, Feb. 23). As a fellow alum, my ring has never lost its luster due to the actions of a few individuals. The authorities must get to the bottom of these accusations but should not create new victims by unfairly labeling an entire football team or university.
JEROME WARD, Denver

If the NCAA allowed student-athletes to get paid—the same way professional athletes are—wouldn't that be a more effective and safer recruiting tool than sex, alcohol and parties?
ROB HO, Los Angeles

Rick Reilly once wrote in a column about Katie Hnida (THE LIFE OF REILLY, Oct. 19, 1998): "Among the best sports moments of the 1990s, this one has to be in the top 10: Katie tearing off her helmet at the end of the first half, taking her place among other members of the homecoming court in their dresses and high heels, being announced as queen, wriggling the sash on over her shoulder pads, waving thanks to everybody, smiling for the photographers and sprinting to the dressing room." It's tragic that the next time Rick wrote about Katie, he was explaining how her success led her, just a year later, to being involved in what is surely one of the worst sports-related moments that one could imagine.
MATT COHEN, Cambridge, Mass.

No one should ever be exposed to what Katie Hnida alleges she was exposed to. I want to believe that the allegations out of Colorado are an isolated incident, but I sincerely doubt that. If this is the culture of college football, college football has no culture, and something must soon be done to correct the abuses.
BEN WITT, Laurel, Md.

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