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July 12, 2004
Can't Forget the Motor City Ben Wallace (How 'Bout Those Pistons, June 21) embodies everything good about the Pistons. He was undervalued coming out of college and went undrafted. He wandered from one team to another, excelled once he got to Detroit and played unselfishly throughout the season and the playoffs.JIM LAWLESSSouth Euclid, Ohio
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July 12, 2004

Letters

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Can't Forget the Motor City
Ben Wallace (How 'Bout Those Pistons, June 21) embodies everything good about the Pistons. He was undervalued coming out of college and went undrafted. He wandered from one team to another, excelled once he got to Detroit and played unselfishly throughout the season and the playoffs.
JIM LAWLESS
South Euclid, Ohio

I recently looked back at your March 3, 2003, cover photo of Kobe Bryant with then Portland Trail Blazer Rasheed Wallace in the background. Now a little more than a year later it's Rasheed getting the last laugh. Once again Wallace proved it's teamwork, not the name on the back of your jersey, that wins titles.
TOM MOWBRAY, Narragansett, R.I.

It is hard for me to understand how you almost completely ignored one of the Pistons' most important players. Tayshaun Prince's defensive performance on Kobe Bryant was recognized by his teammates as one of the keys to Detroit's winning the championship, but Prince was given short shrift in your article.
ROBERT CARY, Fayetteville, Ga.

Speaking His Mind
After reading Michael Silver's article on Barry Zito (Inside the Head of Barry Zito, June 21), I realized why I love baseball so much: the mental aspect of the game. I highlighted many quotes from Zito that I might have to write on Post-its and put on my bathroom mirror when I'm in need of a boost.
ALEX RIVAS, Irvine, Calif.

I found the article on Barry Zito to be insightful but was dismayed to read about Zito losing his virginity. I had hoped to share this article with my son, who plays Little League, as an example of the mental toughness sometimes required to compete at a high level, but now I won't.
STEVE CASTLE, Fremont, Calif.

The Unreal Thing
I am a citizen of Fantasy World (June 21). I'm in fantasy baseball and basketball, and I'm the commissioner of my fantasy football league. I dream of the day that I get a chance to do it for a pro team.
Robert Lynch
RED BANK, N.J.

Being a successful fantasy sports team owner is much like being successful in the stock market. A combination of blue chips and undervalued gems in a diversified portfolio is the way to riches.
Lisa Cotter
SANTA ANA, Calif.

While I thoroughly enjoyed the story about fantasy sports, I was surprised there was no mention of Strat-o-Matic or APBA sports games. These were the original fantasy sports games. My friends and I used to spend many hours playing games using cards based on actual players and their actual stats. I was able to pit the 1927 Yankees against the Big Red Machine.
KEVIN GIBSON, Jeffersonville, Ind.

Inventing fantasy leagues is nothing to be proud of. They are a plague. Because individual statistical gluttony is the objective, the fantasy player's rooting interests are perverted (who cares who wins, as long as my guys get their numbers?), and the true virtues of sports—teamwork and sacrifice—are obliterated.
JOHN CARNEY, Boston

St. Louis Blues
Jarome Iginla as SI's Player of the Year (INSIDE THE NHL, June 21)? Michael Farber's brain must have been frozen. Tampa Bay's Martin St. Louis clearly outplayed Iginla all season and in the Cup finals when it counted most. Do you remember St. Louis's heroic Game 6 overtime goal? Iginla was a bust in Games 6 and 7, when the series was on the line. Thankfully the Hart Trophy voters didn't see it your way.
THOMAS MEACHUM, Palm Harbor, Fla.

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