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THE GAME THAT TIME AND IOWA FORGOT
W.P. Kinsella
April 14, 1986
In this lyrical fantasy, the 1908 Cubs play the Iowa Baseball Confederacy All-Stars in an apocalyptic contest that lasts for 40 days and 2,614 innings, until death and the deluge at last lose out to sweetness and light
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April 14, 1986

The Game That Time And Iowa Forgot

In this lyrical fantasy, the 1908 Cubs play the Iowa Baseball Confederacy All-Stars in an apocalyptic contest that lasts for 40 days and 2,614 innings, until death and the deluge at last lose out to sweetness and light

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The players of the Confederacy mill about, congratulating each other. Drifting Away turns left when he crosses the plate and continues straight down the rightfield line, where he meets and embraces the Black Angel. The Angel's wings enfold him and the two of them continue down the line, a statue and a myth halfway to being reunited. The Angel was a good rightfielder; she batted almost .300 and made only one error in the field.

The rain is already lessening. The black, metal-heavy clouds shrink away toward the horizon, turn ashen, dwindle.

The Cubs gather their gear. Both teams fade away. Stan and I are alone.

The destruction is complete. The town of Big Inning has been swept away. The backstop and bleachers are all that remain. The sky is a blazing amethyst. Somewhere a meadowlark calls. There is little to do but wait for night. Then I will walk again with Stan to the end of the railroad spur and, if the sky is in tune, we'll be headed home.

As we slump on the bench, I think I hear a click like the snapping of a picture with an old box camera. I raise my head and the bleachers are no longer a bruised, sodden black, but owl-gray and dry. The earth at our feet is cracked in interlocking circular patterns. The field is mowed, manicured, immaculate.

"The town," I whisper, touching Stan's shoulder, my finger like a wand bringing him to life.

"What's happened?" he says softly, like a child waking from a dream.

We look up, beyond the backstop. The town is there in the near distance.

"Was it a dream?" says Stan, his eyes-looking as though they'll flood. "No," I say with conviction. "It happened."

"But what day do you think it is? Is it July 4th, or 40 days later?"

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