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In The End The Habs Sure Had It
E.M. Swift
June 02, 1986
Montreal downed Calgary in five games to win the Stanley Cup
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June 02, 1986

In The End The Habs Sure Had It

Montreal downed Calgary in five games to win the Stanley Cup

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"If Lemieux survives he's going to be a good player," said Perron, "but everyone hates him so much that I worry. If I had to coach against him, I think I would hate him, too."

In Game 5 in Calgary, Lemieux kept his ivories to himself and stuck to hockey. The 6'1", 208-pound right wing set up both Canadien goals as Montreal took a 2-1 lead after two periods. Calgary coach Bob Johnson, in a desperate attempt to penetrate the slot in front of Roy, intermittently skated defensemen Neil Sheehy and Jamie Macoun on the forward line, with marginal success. Fotiu was back in uniform, but the way he was playing it was a wonder he had ever been missed. The most he could contribute was four minor penalties. The Canadiens did not allow the Flames any second or third chances, and the few times that Calgary unleashed a shot that was not blocked by the flying henchmen of the Montreal defense, Roy was there.

Midway through the third period, when Green and Smith scored 19 seconds apart to give the Canadiens a 4-1 advantage, the outcome seemed to be settled. Then, inexplicably, Montreal began to play like a team with eight rookies—which it has had all along—allowing the seemingly burnt-out Flames back into the game. Steve Bozek scored from Roy's doorstep at 16:46, and then with 46 seconds left Mullen—who was back in action for Game 5, albeit with a neck brace—made it 4-3 after the Flames had pulled their goalie.

Suddenly Macoun was standing alone in front of the Canadiens' goal, the puck on his stick and an open net before him, with 14 seconds remaining on the clock. Roy dived, Macoun shot and the puck hit the Montreal netminder's stick. Roy covered the puck, and the win—the Canadiens' fourth in a row over the Flames—was finally as iced as the champagne cooling in the Montreal dressing room. "Tonight was my turn to play a great game," said Roy, who had a 1.92 goals-against average in postseason play. "I was lucky, I guess."

Maybe the league was lucky, too. After a crazy playoff year filled with a staggering number of upsets and not a little controversy, after a dramaless Stanley Cup finals that was overshadowed by senseless brawling, Les Canadiens sont l�! The Canadiens, who year in and year out give this troubled sport more class than it sometimes deserves, are back on top. Any season that ends with the Cup in Montreal can't be all that crazy.

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