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The Catch Of The Day
Jill Lieber
October 20, 1986
For consistency and reliability, Steve Largent of the Seahawks is the best of all the NFL receivers
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October 20, 1986

The Catch Of The Day

For consistency and reliability, Steve Largent of the Seahawks is the best of all the NFL receivers

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"Casie is so sweet. She loves to be consoled, to kiss and make up. I never grew up with sisters, so it's a bit of an effort for me to play dolls with her. That concerns me, but I force myself to do it, to braid her hair before I go to work in the morning, because she needs me, too.

"Kelly is just a wild man. He can hug you one minute and bite you the next.

"And Kramer.... Well, Kramer is special, for obvious reasons."

Kramer James Largent, who was named after Steve's close friend Jim Zorn, was born Nov. 11, 1985, with spina bifida, an open spine.

"We were having such a great time in the delivery room, joking around with the doctor," Terry says. "Kramer was born, and I was ecstatic, euphoric. A few seconds later, I heard, 'Ah...we have a little defect here.' I felt like somebody had just dropped a load of logs right on my heart.

"Steve broke down and cried. It tore me up to see him crying so hard. I told Steve that God had planned Kramer and that adding him to our lives would be the greatest thing to ever happen. And I haven't been wrong."

Shortly after birth, Kramer had surgery to close his spine. Though he has progressed remarkably since then—doctors believe he will have almost full use of his legs—it is too early to tell about his bowel and bladder functions. Terry says Kramer is "a happy baby. The happiest of all our children." And for that she is thankful.

"My life had always been so easy, so smooth," she says. "I had never given a thought to how others outside of my immediate family were feeling. I am a much more sympathetic person today. This is a very valuable thing in the children's lives. They will grow up with much more tender hearts."

Steve is already feeling the effects of a tender heart. "When a son is born who is normally healthy, you look forward to throwing the football to him," he says. "You plan that when he gets older, he'll catch frogs and run around the neighborhood with all the other kids.

"But when you have a child with a birth defect you have no expectations—good or bad. If he does anything, it's exciting. For the longest time I never thought Kramer would be able to sit up. It frustrated me. But when he did, I cried. Imagine how I'll be the day he finally walks."

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