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Letters
Edited by Gay Flood
June 29, 1987
THE GRADUATESI am a 20-year-old student-athlete who has just won a hard-fought battle against cancer. Although my setback has had a great impact on my thoughts about my recent collegiate baseball experiences (at State University of New York at Albany), as well as on my plans for the future, your story The Graduates in the June 8 issue has also had a profound effect on me. I now realize that there is more to life than merely succeeding on the baseball diamond.
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June 29, 1987

Letters

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THE GRADUATES
I am a 20-year-old student-athlete who has just won a hard-fought battle against cancer. Although my setback has had a great impact on my thoughts about my recent collegiate baseball experiences (at State University of New York at Albany), as well as on my plans for the future, your story The Graduates in the June 8 issue has also had a profound effect on me. I now realize that there is more to life than merely succeeding on the baseball diamond.

It is true that dedicating yourself to excellence in athletics and having success follow is a wonderful experience, but it is just a stepping-stone, a building block to many other great things in life. Thanks for helping me on my way.
BOB PETTERSEN
Bay Shore, N. Y.

In 1959 I left Harlem to attend Wilber-force University, a black college located in Ohio. I was a small (5'7") basketball player who wanted desperately to get an education. I knew there would be no NBA for me.

Participating in college sports offers more than the thrill of winning and the pain of defeat. It truly can add another dimension to the college experience. Today I deliver babies for a living, and I'm sure that what I learned on the hardwood floor helped me to reach my goal.
IRVING WARD ROBINSON, M.D.
New York City

We need more articles like The Graduates to show that the true student-athlete is a good, solid kid and that there are far greater numbers of these good, solid kids than there are of student-athletes who get in trouble.
SAM KORNHAUSER
Football Coach
State University of New York at Stony Brook

I, too, am maintaining my grades (3.8 GPA at Georgetown Day High School) while I play three sports (volleyball, softball and basketball) a year. Reading the article gave me even more inspiration to excel on and off the court and field. I have just one question for Mount Union graduate Scott Gindles-berger: Will you marry me?
JESSICA KEIMOWITZ
Washington, D.C.

FUTURE PROS
Peter Gammons may be justified in bemoaning the fact that colleges are not grooming baseball players to major league tastes (INSIDE BASEBALL, June 1). However, Gammons failed to mention the most important asset that goes with college baseball: getting an education.

As a former UC Davis shortstop who never "appealed" to major league scouts, I still have something many minor (and major) leaguers do not possess: a college degree.
RICH WALTZ
Spokane

I was saddened to read that major league teams "prefer high school prospects." It is too bad that some promising athletes must make a choice between education and professional sports at such a young age. Shouldn't these kids be able to benefit from both? Come on, let's see some cooperation between the pros and the colleges. The players and the game will be enriched.
M. KATE BURKE
San Antonio

KID K
My dad, now deceased, loved to relate old war stories and sports stories. I remember his telling me once about a guy who struck out 27 batters in nine innings. Some tales Dad told were quite unbelievable, as this one appeared to be at the time. Thanks to Pat Jordan and Ron Necciai for confirming my dad's tale (Kid K, June 1).
DAVID C. HICKS
Bristol, Term.

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