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THESE DUFFERS ARE BAD, BUT THEY'VE BEEN WORSE
Jack McCallum
September 28, 1987
The excited babble of voices on the 18th tee at Linden Hall golf course in Dawson, Pa., floated over to the 17th green. "Hey, come here, you've got to see this! This is unbelievable!" It was, too. Jack Pulford was crouched on one knee, his nose practically touching the grass. He looked like a zoologist sizing up a rare species of earthworm.
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September 28, 1987

These Duffers Are Bad, But They've Been Worse

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"Oh, there's no question we're better," says Pulford, who claims to have broken 100 twice in his quest for the 80s. "If we went back and played the TPC tomorrow, I guarantee there wouldn't be a 200 in the bunch."

In all likelihood three of the WAGs are better, the exception being Ireland, who doesn't play as much as the others. But only a little better. They are still the delightful dukes of dufferdom, capable of making extraordinarily bad shots and disproving, with every club in their professional-looking bags, the axiom that practice makes perfect.

Here are their scores at Linden Hall, a moderately difficult public course: Mosser was low WAG with 116, followed by Pulford (126), Spagnolo (132) and Ireland (136). The tournament was played from the back tees, "just so Angelo could watch other people suffer," as Pulford put it.

A long-driving contest preceded the tourney and—lo and behold—Spagnolo and his then-intact Power-Pod finished fifth with a 209-yard effort. Had there been a prize for deepest drive, of course, Angelo would have been a mortal lock.

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