SI Vault
 
IN SEARCH OF TRUST
Rick Reilly
November 23, 1987
Dexter Manley of the Redskins thought the world had betrayed him—until he faced his daughter's illness and his own alcoholism
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
November 23, 1987

In Search Of Trust

Dexter Manley of the Redskins thought the world had betrayed him—until he faced his daughter's illness and his own alcoholism

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Their plan was to pray Dalis a new leg. In August 1986 they took Dalis to the Washington Convention Center to let the Rev. Fredrick Price, a Los Angeles television evangelist, lay his hands on her. "Satan!" Price yelled. "You will not claim any parts of this child's body!"

He then looked at Glinda and said, "Through your faith will she be healed!"

Dexter and Glinda took Dalis back to the hospital, where tests revealed that, within a few weeks, the bone had begun to develop normally. It is still weak—Dexter II crashed into her this summer and broke it—but the doctors believe it will be normal.

For Manley, Dalis's recovery was a breakthrough. For once, something that couldn't be beaten by strength and speed had been beaten just the same. He had Chopra and Glinda and his children, and now he had somebody he might try trusting even more. "The Big Man," he says.

"I think Dexter is giving back now to the people he once hurt," says Manley's newest friend, Reggie White, the Philadelphia Eagles' star defensive end, whom Manley met at the Pro Bowl. "He's reaching out."

Manley isn't ready for beatification, but he's growing up. He's committed to helping inner-city D.C. youth find food, clothes and jobs. He subsidized a picnic for 500 homeless adults and made sure nobody alerted the media. He has a new agent, Boston-based Bob (Larry Bird, Doug Flutie) Woolf, whom he doesn't plan on meeting in court. He's working on getting his mother fully recovered, taking her to new doctors. He's working hard on life after football—"Don't want to end up a nobody," he says. He has a daily radio show on Washington's WWDC—Scoop Manley has bagged interviews with Howard Cosell, Sugar Ray Leonard and Pete Rozelle—as well as a weekly cable-TV program, on which the most damaging thing he has said so far is, "Detroit couldn't beat a high school team."

He's even settling up with his dad. He wrote him a letter. "I told him I was mad at him that he never told me he loved me," says Manley. "We got it worked out."

In the case of Dexter Manley vs. the World, Manley seems to have decided to call a truce. Is it too late for homecoming?

"Look," he says, pulling out the tattered book. "Check out Sept. 28."

The entry is a quote from, of all people, Julia Child. It reads: "Life itself is the proper binge." Manley flashes a gorgeous, gigantic smile, as if to say, "So here's to it!"

Continue Story
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10