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Letters
Edited by Timothy E. Pitt
June 06, 1988
ROLE REVERSALI would like to thank you for helping to end the Orioles' losing streak. My friends and I knew it would be only a matter of time before the Orioles made your cover (For the Birds, May 2), and that once they did, the dread "cover jinx" would work in reverse.N. MCDANIELS JR. Baltimore
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June 06, 1988

Letters

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ROLE REVERSAL
I would like to thank you for helping to end the Orioles' losing streak. My friends and I knew it would be only a matter of time before the Orioles made your cover (For the Birds, May 2), and that once they did, the dread "cover jinx" would work in reverse.
N. MCDANIELS JR.
Baltimore

I'm one loyal Orioles fan who hated to see the losing streak end. Maybe it wasn't for the right reasons, but for 3� weeks we were the top sports story, the talk of the town. Even World Series champions don't generate that much press for that long. How sweet it was....
MICHELLE RIO
Hollywood, Fla.

ON THE MONEY
The last sentence of William Nack's Kentucky Derby forecast (SCORECARD, May 9) reads, "The guess here is that Winning Colors will win it wire to wire." If Nack is this good a handicapper, give him a full page next year.
ED BERGER
Louisville

SUCCESS STORIES
Once in a while I get to read a sports story that makes my heart beat a little faster. Your May 9 issue contained two such articles: Jane Schwartz's memories of a filly who embodied all the grace and beauty a sports fan could ever ask for (A Runaway for Ruffian) and E.M. Swift's portrait of Jon Peters, a boy living out the American dream (Boy Wonder).
EDWARD E. GARMEY
Cambridge, Mass.

It was a thrill to read A Runaway for Ruffian. Jane Schwartz has just sold a copy of her book. And congratulations to Gene Klein (Another View from the Top, May 9) on the Derby victory of his filly, Winning Colors. Klein is a man who has proved that the old ways of horse racing aren't the only ways.
GEORGE PAGE
Phoenix

When I was a young man, football meant the world to me. In high school I started all four years as an inside linebacker, inspired by visions of Jack Lambert. I'll never forget the spirit of those years. Thus it was nice, in this age of drug problems, contract disputes, holdouts and strikes in professional sports, to see SPORTS ILLUSTRATED dedicate a few pages to high school competition and an athlete like Jon Peters, who is playing baseball, America's best-loved sport, because he loves it.
AIRMAN KENNETH J. LANE
Osan AFB, Republic of Korea

MESSIER MEMORIES
Austin Murphy accurately captured the character and intensity of Edmonton Oilers center Mark Messier (The Look of a Winner, May 9). One of my greatest memories is of Messier openly crying with joy after Edmonton defeated the Islanders to win its first Stanley Cup, in 1984. Not only has Messier shown that he has great hockey skills, but his emotional display that night also revealed how much the thrill of victory means to him. I have been a big fan ever since.
HARVEY LEE
Evanston, Ill.

RODMAN'S REMARKS
Bruce Newman's article on Dennis Rodman of the Detroit Pistons (Black, White—and Gray, May 2) was one heck of a story.

To be sure, Rodman's comments about Larry Bird were, at best, ill-timed and, at worst, borderline racist. However, all of us, at one time or another, have probably made similar comments about someone or have come pretty close.

Rodman is someone all of us—black, white, brown or purple—can respect because of what he has accomplished. Not many of us can look at an opportunity and recognize it for what it is the way Rodman did when he went to play basketball as a freshman at Southeastern Oklahoma State at the age of 22. It was his last chance, and he made the most of it. Dennis, you're an inspiration to every one of us.
PATRICK PETTICREW
Katy, Texas

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