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BETWEEN THE LINES
Peter Gammons
June 20, 1988
THE POWER OF THE PRESSOn June 5 official scorer Charles Scoggins of The Lowell Sun awarded Toronto reliever Duane Ward the victory in a 12-4 romp over Boston, invoking scoring rule 10.19(c), which says the scorer may give a win to the relief pitcher he or she judges to be the most effective. The next day Scoggins received a call at home from Greg Clifton, the agent for Toronto reliever David Wells, who had pitched 2? innings, giving up three hits, walking one and striking out two. (He was followed by Ward who pitched for two scoreless innings, allowing only one hit and a walk.) Clifton questioned Scoggins's decision, pointing out that the Red Sox had received a number of phone calls complaining about it. What he failed to point out was that most of the half dozen or so calls the Sox received were from Rotisserie League owners who had Wells on their teams.
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June 20, 1988

Between The Lines

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THE POWER OF THE PRESS
On June 5 official scorer Charles Scoggins of The Lowell Sun awarded Toronto reliever Duane Ward the victory in a 12-4 romp over Boston, invoking scoring rule 10.19(c), which says the scorer may give a win to the relief pitcher he or she judges to be the most effective. The next day Scoggins received a call at home from Greg Clifton, the agent for Toronto reliever David Wells, who had pitched 2? innings, giving up three hits, walking one and striking out two. (He was followed by Ward who pitched for two scoreless innings, allowing only one hit and a walk.) Clifton questioned Scoggins's decision, pointing out that the Red Sox had received a number of phone calls complaining about it. What he failed to point out was that most of the half dozen or so calls the Sox received were from Rotisserie League owners who had Wells on their teams.

RUMORS OF THEIR DEATH
When the last-place California Angels checked into the Sheraton Centre Park Hotel in Arlington, Texas, on June 6 for a series with the Rangers, they discovered that they would be sharing the hotel with a convention of Texas funeral directors.

WELCOME TO THE SMALL TIME
Kansas City catcher Scotti Madison was sent down to the Triple A Omaha Royals on June 3, and in his first game three days later he was struck in the face by a pitch and knocked unconscious. When Madison came to, trainer Nick Swartz asked him if he knew where he was. "I know I'm not in the major leagues," replied Madison.

NEXT TIME, DON'T ASK
Eight days after Padres president Chub Feeney fired manager Larry Bowa, The San Diego Union ran 23 letters from fans supporting Bowa and one letter backing Feeney. When Feeney complained to the newspaper about the inequity, he was informed that the Union had received only one letter in his defense.

MOVE OVER, MICKEY
On June 3, Oakland's Jose Canseco hit a 456-foot home run against the Twins in the Metrodome, one of the longest ever in that stadium. Then, six days later in a game with the Rangers, he set a park record, blasting a 457-foot shot in Arlington Stadium.

QUOTE OF THE WEEK
Pirates third base coach Gene Lamont, explaining why he wouldn't apply for the vacant Seattle managing job: "I never heard of anybody getting a job they applied for."

THE BIG SWITCHEROO
The Astros are so frustrated by switch-hitter Kevin Bass's lack of lefthanded production that if they can't trade him, they may have him bat righty only. Houston nearly had Bass on the way to Montreal for the disgruntled Hubie Brooks, but the Expos backed off when Bass went 1 for 10 in a three-game series in San Francisco.

MISCELLANEOUS

?When golfer Morris Hatalsky won the Kemper Open on June 5, his caddy was former infielder Tim Foli.

?At week's end, both Pittsburgh second baseman Jose Lind and Baltimore shortstop Cal Ripken Jr. had played every inning of every game this season.

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