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BETWEEN THE LINES
Peter Gammons
July 11, 1988
THE NUMBERS GAMELast Tuesday, New York Yankee designated hitter Jack Clark switched his uniform number from 33 to 6, the number worn earlier this year by, first, catcher Rick Cerone, who was picked up by the Boston Red Sox on April 14, and then, coach Clete Boyer, who was relieved of his job as coach on June 23. Number 6 has special meaning for the Yankees because numbers 1 (Billy Martin), 3 (Babe Ruth), 4 (Lou Gehrig), 5 (Joe DiMaggio), 7 (Mickey Mantle), 8 (Yogi Berra and Bill Dickey), 9 (Roger Maris) and 10 (Phil Rizzuto) have been retired. As for number 2, reserve infielder Wayne Tolleson wears it.
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July 11, 1988

Between The Lines

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THE NUMBERS GAME
Last Tuesday, New York Yankee designated hitter Jack Clark switched his uniform number from 33 to 6, the number worn earlier this year by, first, catcher Rick Cerone, who was picked up by the Boston Red Sox on April 14, and then, coach Clete Boyer, who was relieved of his job as coach on June 23. Number 6 has special meaning for the Yankees because numbers 1 ( Billy Martin), 3 ( Babe Ruth), 4 ( Lou Gehrig), 5 ( Joe DiMaggio), 7 ( Mickey Mantle), 8 ( Yogi Berra and Bill Dickey), 9 ( Roger Maris) and 10 ( Phil Rizzuto) have been retired. As for number 2, reserve infielder Wayne Tolleson wears it.

MA BELL PLAYER OF THE WEEK
On June 25 the first pitch of a game in Anaheim, Calif., between the Milwaukee Brewers and the California Angels was delivered while Angel centerfielder Devon White was still in the clubhouse, reportedly talking on the telephone. The Brewers' leadoff hitter, Jim Gantner, took a called strike before the umpires realized the Angels had only eight players on the field. The pitch was nullified, and after White took the field, the game was restarted and Gantner singled to center.

GOING BATTY
Last year, diligent Texas Rangers outfielder Pete Incaviglia, who likes to take extra batting practice, used 37 dozen bats, all paid for by the team. At $17 per bat, Incaviglia's wood cost the club $7,548, or $13.41 per plate appearance. So far this season, the Rangers have ordered him another 18 dozen.

IS ANYBODY WATCHING OUT THERE?
Players constantly complain about the fans' All-Star voting, but when USA Today asked the players to select a team of major league MVPs, the pros made the Kansas City Royals' George Brett their sixth choice at third base, even though Brett has been playing first all season.

PINCH PITCHERS

The five nonpitchers who had taken the mound through Sunday—leftfielder Dan Gladden of the Minnesota Twins, utilityman Jose Oquendo of the St. Louis Cardinals, infielder Dave Concepcion of the Cincinnati Reds, utilityman Jim Morrison of the Atlanta Braves and outfielder John Cangelosi of the Pittsburgh Pirates—had given up only two earned runs and 10 hits in 10? innings for a 1.69 ERA. Oquendo, who got nicked for a pair of runs by the Braves on May 14, is the only part-timer who has been scored on, and those runs came in his fourth inning of work.

NEXT YEAR, THE WORLD
When San Francisco Giants infielder Harry Spilman, who got his first stolen base just last year, hit his first triple on June 28, after 749 career at bats, manager Roger Craig quipped, "Harry's hot, a stolen base and triple in back-to-back seasons." The hit came off the aforementioned Morrison, who went 844 consecutive at bats without a triple in 1979 and '80.

A MAJOR LEAGUER
When Cincinnati owner Marge Schott went to Rome last week, she brought along a gift for the Pope, a Reds warmup jacket with JOHN PAUL 2 inscribed on the back.

MISCELLANEOUS

?Through Sunday, Boston second baseman Marty Barrett led all American League infielders—including first basemen—in runs produced, with 90.

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