SI Vault
 
KEEPING AN EAGLE EYE ON OUR FEATHERED FRIENDS
Stu Stuller
August 22, 1988
On the morning of Jan. 30, a clutch of bird-watchers combing residential Ventura, Calif., spotted a hummingbird they couldn't identify from the standard U.S. field guides. Someone suggested trying a guide to the birds of Mexico, and when one was located, the tiny stranger was pegged as a female Xantus' humming-bird. A native of southern Baja, the bird was the first of its species reported north of the border.
Decrease font Decrease font
Enlarge font Enlarge font
August 22, 1988

Keeping An Eagle Eye On Our Feathered Friends

View CoverRead All Articles View This Issue

On the morning of Jan. 30, a clutch of bird-watchers combing residential Ventura, Calif., spotted a hummingbird they couldn't identify from the standard U.S. field guides. Someone suggested trying a guide to the birds of Mexico, and when one was located, the tiny stranger was pegged as a female Xantus' humming-bird. A native of southern Baja, the bird was the first of its species reported north of the border.

A call was placed immediately to the North American Rare Bird Alert in High Point, N.C., and once the news was reported, NARBA's Bob and Pam Odear went into action: While Pam updated the tape recording on the group's hotline number, her husband telephoned birders on a special We Call You list.

A birder is usually a bird-watcher in motion, most often in pursuit of something scarce, and NARBA serves as a command center. For a fee of $31.50 a year, NARBA gives birders access to its hotline, which provides information on the sightings of rare birds anywhere in North America.

In addition to offering the hotline, the We Call You service allows subscribers to submit a list of species they hope to add to their life lists, so that they can be notified when and where a specimen is spotted. Fees are assessed on an upfront, per-bird basis. The rarer the bird, the lower the fee because the odds against one of those birds being spotted are longer, so there is less likelihood that the Odears will have to spend time informing subscribers of a sighting.

The Odears say that about 40 subscribers were telephoned the day the Xantus' hummingbird report came in. All subscribers but one—he was birding in Australia—headed for Ventura at the first opportunity. Sandy Komito, co-owner of an industrial roofing business in Fair Lawn, N.J., left for the airport as soon as Bob Odear called. He arrived in California that same evening. Early the next morning, using NARBA location information, which pinpointed the very tree where the bird was nesting, Komito spotted the little tourist and headed back to New Jersey in time for dinner.

"You have to understand," says Bob Odear, "that we're dealing with birds that are lost. They have no business being here. As a consequence, they normally don't stick around very long."

Indeed, despite nesting twice, the hummingbird hung around Ventura for only a month. During that time, however, more than 1,000 birders, many of them from out of state, signed a logbook provided by a local resident acting as the bird's host.

In chasing rarities a birder depends almost entirely on reports from the field. Until recently such reports were as fleeting as rumors and often less reliable. "There was an old-boy network that took care of perhaps a hundred people," says Bob. "That left the vast majority of birders out in the cold. You usually didn't find out about a bird until it was too late. Or you would chase the bird and find out it wasn't as advertised."

In 1985, the 51-year-old Odear left his job as CEO at Wrangler apparel, and with Pam's help (she also gave up a career, in marketing research and business forecasting), set about establishing a reliable system for gathering and disseminating birding information. One of his first calls went to Chattanooga to anesthesiologist Benton Basham, who with 793 birds (as of Aug. 1) on his North American life list, is at the very top of birding's numbers game. Basham was excited. "It was a godsend," he says. "Birders had hoped the American Birding Association or some other organization would do a national rare bird alert, but it never occurred because of the tremendous cost involved."

Cost, of course, was a concern of Odear's but not necessarily a deterrent. "It was my money. If I wanted to take it out to the street and set fire to it, that was my business," he says.

Continue Story
1 2
Related Topics
  ARTICLES GALLERIES COVERS
Bob Odear 1 0 0
Benton Basham 1 0 0
Ventura 10 0 0
California 4412 0 4
New Jersey 921 0 0