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Calling A Game
Mike Scioscia
April 05, 1989
On the evening of Oct. 16, 1988, in Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, Orel Hershiser pitched a three-hit shutout in Game 2 of the World Series. The Dodgers beat the Oakland A's 6-0 and went on to become the unlikely world champions. Hershiser spun a 106-pitch masterpiece that night, but he would be the first to say that he didn't do it alone; his partner was Dodger catcher Mike Scioscia, who flashed the signals for every pitch. Scioscia recently met with SI's Peter Gammons and reviewed that game, batter by batter. Here's his analysis.
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April 05, 1989

Calling A Game

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PARKER

Orel really wanted the shutout once he got this close, and decided to go to the windup. Parker had all three of the A's hits, and all had come on Orel's sinking pitches. We'd shown him the big breaking ball only twice before, so we started him off with a curve outside. Then a good breaking ball for a called strike and another curveball inside that Parker missed for strike two. Then Orel simply finished him off with an unhittable curve down and in. Swing and a miss. Strike three. Game over.

No runs, no hits, no errors. Dodgers win 6-0.

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